Improper maintenance could have cost the lives of two surveyors says UK P&I Club case study

Photo credit: UK P&I Club
Photo credit: UK P&I Club

In UK P&I Club’s latest ‘Lessons Learned’ series of case studies, Captain David Nichol presents the case regarding improper ventilation after a maintenance operation, which could have led to the deaths of two surveyors during a third party survey on the emergency fire pump.

About the incident
During a third party survey, the surveyor made a request to test the emergency fire pump, which was arranged with the assistance of the chief engineer. The emergency fire pump was located in a recessed well in the steering gear compartment, approximately 3 metres deep and accessed by an inclined stairway. At the start of the test, the surveyor asked to observe the pump being started locally and operating before proceeding on deck to check the hoses rigged fore and aft.

Shortly after descending into the fire pump well, the chief engineer urgently ordered the surveyors to get out and by the time both men reached the steering compartment deck, they were Continue reading “Improper maintenance could have cost the lives of two surveyors says UK P&I Club case study”

Lifecord – a kill cord you will never forget – launched by Landau

Lifecord - a kill cord you will never forget - launched by Landau
Lifecord – a kill cord you will never forget – launched by Landau

Lifecord is a newly designed kill cord providing the certainty and reliability of a tethered connection between a boat’s engine ignition kill switch and pilot, ensuring the vessel’s engine stops should the pilot be inadvertently thrown from the helm. However, unlike the typical passive kill cords commonly seen, Lifecord is a ‘smart’ kill cord incorporating detection technology designed to trigger an audible and visual warning alarm should Lifecord be connected to the boat’s kill switch but not the pilot, similar to the seat belt warning in your car.

Lifecord’s uniquely designed Key and Clasp connector is comfortable to wear and can be operated easily even while wearing gloves. It also offers a secondary method of pilot connection using Continue reading “Lifecord – a kill cord you will never forget – launched by Landau”

UK canal rescues reach record levels in 2017

UK canal rescues reach record levels in 2017
UK canal rescues reach record levels in 2017

The number of canal rescues carried out by River Canal Rescue in 2017 has again reached a new high.

In the period from January 1 to December 31, teams from RCR attended 162 incidents (137 major and 25 minor), 8% up from 150 (119 major and 31 minor) in 2016.

Major is defined as submerged, partially sunken or grounded craft, plus salvage work; minor as situations which on attendance, can be resolved without the need for a full rescue team.

Lapse of concentration
“The main causes of major rescues are silling or catching the rudder in the lock,” explained RCR MD Stephanie Horton. “Usually this is due to a momentary lapse of concentration and something that can happen to experienced and inexperienced boaters.”

And she explained that other reasons for rescue often include Continue reading “UK canal rescues reach record levels in 2017”

Updated guidelines for the carriage of calcium hypochlorite in containers

Updated guidelines for the carriage of calcium hypochlorite in containers
Updated guidelines for the carriage of calcium hypochlorite in containers

The International Group of P&I Clubs (IG Clubs) and the shipping line members of the Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) have issued a revised version of the guidelines for the carriage of calcium hypochlorite in containers.

The Guidelines were first issued in May 2016, with version 2.0 of the Guidelines issued in January 2017 to take account of the package limit of 100lb drums under US measurement as well as the package limit of 45kg net weight.

The Guidelines can be considered Continue reading “Updated guidelines for the carriage of calcium hypochlorite in containers”

MAIB issues safety bulletin on the use of safety harness tethers on sailing yachts

Figure 1: Tether hook under deck cleat
Figure 1: Tether hook under deck cleat

Background
The sailing yacht CV30 was taking part in the third leg of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race having left Cape Town on 31 October 2017 bound for Fremantle, Western Australia. At about 1414 local time on 18 November 2017, the yacht was in position 42°30.3’S, 087°36.3’E, approximately 1500nm from Fremantle, when a crew member, Simon Speirs, fell overboard. He was attached to the yacht by his safety harness tether. The hook at the end of the tether that was clipped to a jack-line, deformed and released resulting in him becoming separated from the yacht. Simon Speirs was recovered unconscious onto the yacht but sadly could not be resuscitated.

Continue reading “MAIB issues safety bulletin on the use of safety harness tethers on sailing yachts”