MAIB issues urgent safety bulletin after keel failure to a commercial yacht

The MAIB is investigating the keel failure and capsize of the UK registered commercial yacht Tyger of London while on passage from La Gomera to Tenerife, on 7 December 2017. The five persons on board were rescued from the water by the crew of a nearby yacht.

Tyger of London was a Comar Comet 45S designed by Vallicelli & C and built in 2007 by Comar Yachts s.r.l, at Fiumicino, Italy. In common with other vessels built by the shipbuilder, the Comet 45S could be fitted with a choice of two keels:
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Catastrophic engine failure the cause of fire on Wight Sky ferry says MAIB report

At 2133 on 12 September 2017, while approaching Yarmouth, Isle of Wight, the ro-ro passenger ferry Wight Sky suffered a catastrophic failure of one of its Volvo Penta D16 main propulsion engines, followed by a fire. The fire was brought under control in less than 2 minutes, but the vessel’s engineer, who had been standing near the engine, suffered serious burn injuries to his hands and face. Although he was discharged from hospital 7 days later, he was subsequently diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and had not returned to work at the time of publishing this report.

Safety lessons
– Rebuilding the engine and transporting it in parts to the engine room through an emergency escape rather than using the vessel’s deck Continue reading “Catastrophic engine failure the cause of fire on Wight Sky ferry says MAIB report”

The Marine Accident Investigation Branch annual report for 2017 has been published

The Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) has published its 112 page annual report for 2017 today.  the report in full can be downloaded in pdf format below. Writing in his introduction for the final time after eight years with the Branch, Steve Clinch, Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents, says:

“2017 was a typically busy year for the Branch, not only in terms of its investigation workload but also in respect of its effort to promulgate the safety message, build relationships with stakeholders and train its staff. Included in this report is a selection of the diary entries for MAIB staff, which I hope will provide a flavour of the diverse nature of the work they have been involved with during the year.

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Urgent safety lessons issued by MAIB after the failure of a throw bag rescue line

RIBER, and several other suppliers of throw bag rescue lines, import the complete manufactured product pre-branded with their company’s logo.
RIBER, and several other suppliers of throw bag rescue lines, import the complete manufactured product pre-branded with their company’s logo.

A defective throw bag rescue line was discovered while Warrington Rowing Club was conducting boat capsize drills for new rowers at Halton Baths in Cheshire, UK. A 15m long polypropylene rescue line in a throw bag, supplied by Riber Products Limited (RIBER), parted while a young person in the water was being pulled to the side of the pool during a simulated rescue. There were no injuries. The rowing club safety advisor subsequently found another throw bag with a defective rescue line that had been purchased from the same supplier. RIBER was informed and the company contacted its customers after identifying a batch of 208 throw bags that could be at risk. A further three defective rescue lines have been identified as a consequence of the customer warning notice posted on Facebook. Considering the potentially serious consequences of a throw bag rescue line failing in a real lifesaving situation, the MAIB is conducting a safety investigation.

Initial findings
On inspection, the defective RIBER throw bag rescue lines identified by Warrington Rowing Club were found to have been made up of sections of polypropylene rope fused together, which broke easily at the joint when put under tension. One line was constructed of two sections of rope fused together, Continue reading “Urgent safety lessons issued by MAIB after the failure of a throw bag rescue line”

Sinking raises safety issues on bilge alarms

The failure of engine cooling system pipework is one of the most common causes of flooding on small fishing vessels
The failure of engine cooling system pipework is one of the most common causes of flooding on small fishing vessels

In its latest Safety Digest, the UK MAIB provides learnins about an 8.13m fibreglass fishing vessel that was engaged in picking up its fleets of creels when it began to take on water and subsequently sank. The skipper, who was working alone, managed to deploy the boat’s liferaft and climb into it as the boat was sinking and was later rescued without injuries.

The incident
The skipper went out to sea shortly after daybreak to recover his two fleets of creels. The weather was good. As soon as he arrived at the fishing grounds, he hauled in the first fleet of creels and stowed it on the aft end of the deck. He then headed at speed toward the second fleet of creels.

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