ILO adopts a new Code of Practice to improve safety and health in shipbuilding and ship repair

ILO adopts a new Code of Practice to improve safety and health in shipbuilding and ship repair
ILO adopts a new Code of Practice to improve safety and health in shipbuilding and ship repair

Representatives of governments and the social partners from around the world gathered at the ILO from 22 to 26 January 2018 to adopt a revised code of practice on safety and health in shipbuilding and ship repair.

The new code reflects the many changes in the industry, including the use of robotic systems, over the last 43 years since an earlier code was adopted by the ILO. It focuses on the need for a preventive approach based on occupational safety and health (OSH) management systems, management of change and safe work plans among others.

Participants emphasized the importance of improving occupational safety and health (OSH) in shipbuilding and ship repair. Improved OSH performance will reduce Continue reading “ILO adopts a new Code of Practice to improve safety and health in shipbuilding and ship repair”

Teak compliance issues in the UK to be discussed

Teak compliance issues in the UK to be discussed
Teak compliance issues in the UK to be discussed

British Marine and environmental charity, the Environment Investigation Agency (EIA), are to meet to discuss teak compliance issues.

The EIA alleges that some UK boat builders are using Burmese teak that has been imported illegally in breach of the European Union Timber Regulation.

However Howard Pridding, British Marine CEO says it is a very complex issue and the boatbuilders are not contravening any regulations. In addition, focusing on the boatbuilders is damaging the marine industry.

Continue reading “Teak compliance issues in the UK to be discussed”

The World LPG Association puts the focus on marine in a new report

The World LPG Association puts the focus on marine in a new report
The World LPG Association puts the focus on marine in a new report

The World LPG Association (WLPGA), with its continued commitment to cleaner environment, has issued a report “LPG for Marine Engines – The Marine Alternative Fuel”, dedicated to the use of LPG in the marine sector.

With upcoming stricter IMO emission rules, the global 0.5 sulphur cup, ECAS and SECAs emission limits and the requirements for higher quality fuel, it is inevitable that there will be a radical change in shipping fuel options from HFO to cleaner alternatives. Amongst the options, LPG is one of the promising solutions for the reduction of exhaust emissions from marine vessels. LPG as a clean and immediately available energy source, is characterised by low particle emissions, low NOx (nitrogen oxide) and nearly zero SOx (sulphur oxide) emissions, offering significant environmental advantages while meeting all energy and environmental challenges.

The WLPGA report aims to open the doors for LPG as the next marine alternative fuel. The report contains a wealth of information, data and compelling arguments in support of using LPG as the fuel of choice in marine vessels. It also promotes the understanding of Continue reading “The World LPG Association puts the focus on marine in a new report”

Boat Safety Scheme certification charges set to rise as part of new four year business and investment plan

Boat Safety Scheme certification charges set to rise as part of new four year business and investment plan
Boat Safety Scheme certification charges set to rise as part of new four year business and investment plan

The Boat Safety Scheme (BSS) Management Committee has agreed a new four-year business plan to resource its work to 2022 and invest in improvements that will have an even longer-term benefit. The plan also includes the first price rise in certification charges for eight years.

BSS Examiners will pay a new price of £36 (excluding VAT) for each certification they issue to a boat, which is a £7 rise that they will likely choose to pass onto customers.

The new price will apply from 1 April 2018 and the Scheme intends holding it for at least the whole of the four-year business plan period, which is designed to coincide with the four-year lifespan of BSS Certification.

The new BSS business plan includes additional support to BSS Examiners, projects to improve the quality of examinations and enhancements to customer service.

The Scheme acknowledges that times are tough and boaters face other price increases associated with their Continue reading “Boat Safety Scheme certification charges set to rise as part of new four year business and investment plan”

Request to transfer UK rivers to the CRT gets mixed response

Request to transfer UK rivers to the CRT gets mixed response
Request to transfer UK rivers to the CRT gets mixed response

The Canal & River Trust (CRT) has put in a formal request to the Government to transfer the Thames, Nene, Great Ouse, Medway and other Environment Agency (EA) rivers to CRT which has met with a mixed response from user groups.

The idea has been discussed numerous times in the past, and was to have taken place when CRT was formed from the former British Waterways in 2012. But the plan was scuppered by the twin problems of the lack of any EA property ‘dowry’ (unlike the considerable commercial portfolio which came from BW and provides some £50m a year in rentals), and the complexity on some rivers of disentangling navigation from other responsibilities (such as flooding) which would stay with the EA. A subsequent proposal Continue reading “Request to transfer UK rivers to the CRT gets mixed response”