CRT to create regional teams to improve customer service and engage with local communities

Richard Parry, CRT CEO (pictured right)
Richard Parry, CRT CEO (pictured right)

Canal & River Trust will move resource from its centrally based roles into its six regional customer-facing teams to improve customer service and engage with local communities.

The changes will be made as part of the trust’s waterways and well being strategy and will see operational management roles adapted to meet the requirements of the new regions.

Richard Parry, CEO, commented: “The Trust has been repositioning as a charity for the waterways and well being, with a new structure that has seen us move from ten waterways to six larger regions, with some activities previously managed centrally now devolved to these regional teams, and a reduction in senior manager numbers overall.

Continue reading “CRT to create regional teams to improve customer service and engage with local communities”

Workboat apprenticeship scheme tackles skills and crewing challenges

Training providers including 54 North Maritime and Red Ensign are drawing up plans to run courses for the scheme
Training providers including 54 North Maritime and Red Ensign are drawing up plans to run courses for the scheme

The National Workboat Association (NWA) has finalised its Workboat Crewmember Apprenticeship standard as the industry faces growing skills and crewing challenges in the thriving workboat sector.

This scheme is aimed at addressing industry concerns about falling numbers of young people entering the industry at ground level, exasperated by experienced seafarers leaving the industry, often by retirement.

As well as tugs and ‘multicat’-type vessels the definition of workboat in this context includes: offshore wind personnel transfer vessels, survey craft and pilot vessels, all sectors experiencing growth involving increasingly sophisticated and technically demanding vessels but still requiring seamanship skills that have been around for generations. The new apprenticeship standard has now been finalised, paving the way for the scheme to be rolled out by training providers across England and Wales.

The Workboat Crewmember Standard and assessment has been Continue reading “Workboat apprenticeship scheme tackles skills and crewing challenges”

Loss of propulsion leads dredger to collide with loaded barge says report

The FRPD 309 sustained damage to the shell plating and forepeak tank forward of the collision bulkhead. In addition, the port anchor was disconnected from its housing and became wedged in the Evco 60's hull
The FRPD 309 sustained damage to the shell plating and forepeak tank forward of the collision bulkhead. In addition, the port anchor was disconnected from its housing and became wedged in the Evco 60’s hull

The Transportation Safety Board of Canada released its investigation report into the collision of the dredger FRPD 309 with the loaded barge Evco 60, on 5 December 2017, in the Fraser River.

The incident
On 04 December 2017, the dredger FRPD 309 departed a shipyard in Delta, BC, to begin dredging in the Fraser River. The vessel is a conventional trailing arm suction dredger, with the bridge and accommodation located forward and machinery space located aft. Before departure, the crew had carried out pre-departure checks, a safety meeting, and emergency drills.

After arriving at the dredging location, the vessel started dredging sand and sediment from the river bed into the hopper using the 2 trailing arms and a dredging pump. When the hopper was filled, the sand and sediment was pumped ashore via a pipeline. The master left the bridge, handing over the command of the vessel to the officer of the watch (OOW). Two engineers, 2 deckhands, and a pipe operator were also on duty.

As the vessel was turning and the pipe operator was raising the trailing arms to the deck level, the vessel experienced Continue reading “Loss of propulsion leads dredger to collide with loaded barge says report”

Complaints received by the Canal & River Trust are on the up

Of the other complaints, there was one about the routing of HS2, as well as others in some way related to land or property.
Of the other complaints, there was one about the routing of HS2, as well as others in some way related to land or property.

252 complaints were received by the Canal & River Trust in 2017/18, according to the latest Waterways Ombudsman report.

The report show that the number of complaints is above the average of 225 over the past five years. During the year the Ombudsman received 35 enquiries about the Trust, down on 39 last year. Fifteen new investigations were opened, which was one more than the previous year and the number of completed investigations was 14, three lower than the previous year.

Of the 14 investigations completed, one was upheld, while in a further four investigations the complaint was either upheld in part, or elements of it were upheld. Goodwill awards were proposed in three cases, although in one case the complainant did not accept it.

Wide-ranging complaints
There was a very diverse range of complaints. The majority were about Continue reading “Complaints received by the Canal & River Trust are on the up”

Unique identifiers for human-powered and small sail vessels can be exempt says AMSA

AMSA recognised that requiring a unique identifier for every human-powered vessel and sailing vessels less than 7.5 metres, may not be practical for some operators, particularly operators with a high number of unpowered vessels that are replaced frequently.
AMSA recognised that requiring a unique identifier for every human-powered vessel and sailing vessels less than 7.5 metres, may not be practical for some operators, particularly operators with a high number of unpowered vessels that are replaced frequently.

From 1 September 2018, owners of human-powered and sailing vessels less than 7.5 metres can be exempt from having to get a unique identifier for each vessel, if a certificate of operation covers the vessels.

Alternatively, owners may choose to continue to apply for a unique identifier for each vessel and remain exempt from having a certificate of operation. The unique identifier does not need to be displayed on the vessel.

AMSA recognised that requiring a unique identifier for every human-powered vessel and sailing vessels less than 7.5 metres, may not be practical for some operators, particularly operators with a high number of unpowered vessels that are replaced frequently.

Exemption 1 allows greater flexibility around the unique identifier requirements for human-powered and small sailing vessels covered by a certificate of operation

The change to Exemption 1 means that owners of human-powered vessels and sailing vessels less than 7.5 metres will have now have Continue reading “Unique identifiers for human-powered and small sail vessels can be exempt says AMSA”

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