Report finds fire onboard cargo vessel was due to lack of compliance with SMS

The NTSB has published its report on the fire that took place on board the cargo ship Chipolbrok Moon on 23 May 2018. The fire occurred while the ship was moored at the Industrial Terminal West in Greens Bayou in the Port of Houston, Texas.

The incident
On May 21, the Chipolbrok Moon arrived at Industrial Terminal West in Houston. After the ocean voyage and before offloading the cargo, the steel sea fastener tabs used to secure the turbine components had to be removed by cutting, using an oxygen/acetylene torch.

The next afternoon, a marine chemist tested the atmosphere in cargo holds no. 2 port, no. 3 port and starboard, and no. 4 starboard for oxygen content and presence of flammable vapors to determine if it was safe to carry out hotwork.

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Future and emerging trends in the world of salvage and wreck removal

Sam Kendall-Marsden, head of claims for The Standard Club, has given an insight into the future and emerging trends and significant issues in the world of salvage and wreck removal.

Mr Kendall-Marsden focuses on five key areas which are mega boxship casualties, waste management, technology, the changing nature of the salvage industry and wildcards.

1. Mega boxship casualties

This part focuses on casualties involving very large container vessels in which Mr Kendall-Masden articulates that the size increases the risk of accidents. A major casualty involving big vessels could easily lead to environmental disasters and significantly increase a company’s financial exposure.

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Over 50% of flag states could be removed from STCW White List

Iran in the quot White List quot of Revised STCW Convention

IMO’s Sub-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watchkeeping (HTW 6) considered matters relating to the list of STCW Parties (“White List”) and its review, as required by the STCW Convention. The Sub-committee found that the white list of top-rated flag states would be decimated if requirements to report information were strictly enforced.

IMO holds a ‘White List’ containing countries who have confirmed to the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) to be following the relevant provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978 (STCW Convention).

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First judgement of Hague and Hague Visby rules tested in the English courts

Britannia P&I Club referred to the English supreme court that presented its first authoritative judgement in English law, addressing the question of whether it is the carrier or cargo interests who bears the burden of proof under the Hague and Hague-visby rules.

The case had to do with a low value claim for condensation damage to coffee beans.

In the first trial the judge ruled in favour of the cargo deciding that where goods shipped in apparent good order and condition show loss or damage on discharge, there is an evidential inference that the loss or damage is caused by the fault of the carrier.

The carrier then has the burden of showing that it has not breached any of its obligations.

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