Clean Maritime Plan: Diesel’s days could be numbered for UK domestic vessels and inland waterways

Clean Maritime Plan
Clean Maritime Plan

The diesel engine could be on the way out if the Government carries its recently launched Clean Maritime Plan through to its conclusion.

Part of the Clean Air Strategy, which aims to cut air pollution across all sectors to make the UK “net zero” on greenhouse gases by 2050, the Plan sets out how the Government hopes to achieve ‘zero emissions shipping’. But despite this wording, it doesn’t just affect seagoing craft. The plan also covers inland shipping and recreational boats, and a Call for Evidence has been issued specifically for “domestic vessels and inland waterways”.

This states clearly that “the expectation that the maritime sector will transition away from fossil fuels extends to all parts of the sector, including those vessels on inland waterways”. And a Government announcement accompanying the launch Continue reading “Clean Maritime Plan: Diesel’s days could be numbered for UK domestic vessels and inland waterways”

USCG says MARPOL deficiencies found on bilge alarm systems

USCG makes recommendations after discovery
USCG makes recommendations after discovery

During an inspection by the Marine Safety Detachment Port Canaveral Port State Control Officers, there were MARPOL deficiencies identified related to the 15-ppm Bilge Alarm system of the Oily Water Separators (OWS) onboard four separate ships.

Specifically, the PSCOs discovered that the entries in the Oil Record Book (ORB) weren’t compliant to the Bilge Alarm Data being displayed by the bilge alarm, also known as oil content meter.

Concerning the Bilge Alarm Data, it is required to record:
– date
– time
– alarm status
– the operating status of the 15-ppm Bilge Separator.

Moreover, the device is required to store the data for minimum of eight months, so that data is displayed or printed in a protocol for official system inspections as Continue reading “USCG says MARPOL deficiencies found on bilge alarm systems”

Hapag-Lloyd set to impose $15,000 penalty for mis-declaration of hazardous cargoes

Hapag-Lloyd
Hapag-Lloyd

Following the Yantian Express fire incident that Hapag-Lloyd experienced in early 2019, the company has published a statement to say that they will implement a penalty of USD 15,000.00 per container with effect from 15 September 2019.

Specifically, the company highlights that failure to properly declare hazardous cargoes prior to shipment is a violation of the Hazardous Material Regulations. Such violations may be subject to monetary fines and/or criminal prosecution under applicable law.

Hapag-Lloyd has also noted that to ensure the safety of our crew, ships and Continue reading “Hapag-Lloyd set to impose $15,000 penalty for mis-declaration of hazardous cargoes”

West of England P&I Club says More can be done to prevent engine room fires

Photo credit: West of England P&I Club
Photo credit: West of England P&I Club

West of England P&I Club says that it is well known that fires on ships require a lot of effort to address. And they risk all those on board, presenting extreme danger to the vessel. Engine room fires are especially challenging to put out because of the potential confined nature of the scene and an abundance of fire triangle elements; namely heat, fuel and air.

Now, condition surveys conducted by the West of England P&I Club repeatedly present worrying examples of substandard fire safety in engine rooms which can easily be avoided by taking some simple steps.

The main sources of ignition in the engine room include hot exhaust manifolds of engines, boilers and indicator valves of the engines. When flammable Continue reading “West of England P&I Club says More can be done to prevent engine room fires”

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