USCG publishes a safety alert after three confined space fatalities on a MODU

Seven of the crew onboard were involved in the dewatering operation and this incident. All were experienced mariners, but lacked MODU experience.
Seven of the crew onboard were involved in the dewatering operation and this incident. All were experienced mariners, but lacked MODU experience.

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has issued an important Safety Alert on the dangers of confined space entry following a recent incident where three people were asphyxiated in a confined space on a drilling rig (MODU).

The USCG says that studies show that people often miss the obvious clues while working under enhanced stress and because their focus is on another activity. Several sources indicate that over 50% of those who perish in enclosed and confined spaces accidents do so while trying to assist and rescue their co-workers.

Ten crewmembers were on board the MODU preparing it for a heavy lift transport to an overseas ship breaking facility. They were successful in dewatering three of the MODU’s four legs.

Yet, the de-ballasting system was inoperable in the fourth leg because piping and valves had been previously removed. To continue pumping, the crew rigged a portable diesel engine driven pump to discharge the tanks.

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New technology aims to reduce underwater radiated noise generated by ships’ propeller cavitation

While PressurePores are suitable for all types of vessel, they are particularly suitable for naval vessels, fishing fleets, offshore vessels and cruise ships operating in sensitive environments.
While PressurePores are suitable for all types of vessel, they are particularly suitable for naval vessels, fishing fleets, offshore vessels and cruise ships operating in sensitive environments.

A new technology aimed at reducing the underwater radiated noise (URN) generated by ships’ propeller cavitation has been developed by Strathclyde University and Oscar Propulsion.

The patented Oscar PressurePores system reduces propeller tip vortex cavitation by applying a small number of strategically bored holes in the propeller blades.

The addition of these pressure-relieving holes now allows ships to operate with a more silent propeller with a minimum of compromise on its efficiency or having to slow steam. Reducing cavitation also reduces its associated erosive effect.

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IG Clubs continue to implement survey triggers for tankers carrying HFO

If a vessel continues to carry HFO as cargo over a period of successive years, the Club is not obliged to carry out a survey every year.
If a vessel continues to carry HFO as cargo over a period of successive years, the Club is not obliged to carry out a survey every year.

As part of the industry’s efforts to ensure higher ship standards, the International Group of P&I Clubs (IG Clubs) continues to implement survey triggers for seagoing vessels of 10 years of age or more carrying HFO, the American P&I Club has reminded the industry in a bulletin.

As a consequence, all sea-going vessels aged 10 years or more which have carried heavy HFO as cargo within the previous 12 months will be subject to condition survey, unless:
– the vessel has undergone a P&I club condition survey during the previous 12 months; or
– the vessel has undergone a Special Survey during the previous 6 months; or
– the vessel has a valid Condition Assessment Program (CAP) rating of 1 or 2 with a classification society having membership in the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS).
– HFO is defined as residual fuel with a kinematic viscosity of 380 centipoises when measured at 50 degrees Celsius by the ISO 3104 test method.

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IMO introduces new safety signage standard

The ISO Committee on Graphical Symbols had been working to devise a consistent system for safety signage for both maritime and on-shore applications
The ISO Committee on Graphical Symbols had been working to devise a consistent system for safety signage for both maritime and on-shore applications

Since 1st January 2019, hundreds of new International Maritime Organisation (IMO) compliant signs entered into force as part of the new IMO Resolution A.1116(30) Escape Route Signs and Equipment Location Markings. The assembly of the IMO recalls resolutions A760(18) as amended by resolution MSC82(70), and A952(23).

It has agreed to adopt the safety symbols of ISO 7010 and ISO 24409-2 and, subsequently, all escape route signs, equipment location markings and other safety signage aboard a vessel must be compliant and brought into line.

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