Environment Agency set to increase boat charges

The EA is the second largest navigation authority in the UK and is responsible for more than 1,000km of navigable waterways.
The EA is the second largest navigation authority in the UK and is responsible for more than 1,000km of navigable waterways.

The Environment Agency is to increase the cost of boat registrations on its waterways from 2019 which it says will help ensure a sustainable service and cover maintenance.

It said that the new charges for 2019-21 will be invested in waterways enjoyed by around 29,000 boat users, helping to meet the shortfall between the cost of running the service and the income currently generated from annual boat registrations.

“We realise an increase in charges is never welcome news but it is essential to keep the levels of service and maintenance which boaters tell us is needed,” said Mark Ormrod, EA national manager for navigation.

“In addition, we are exploring new income streams to make our Continue reading “Environment Agency set to increase boat charges”

AMSA has reported seven serious marine incidents in October

AMSA has published a list of the most serious incidents that occurred during October
AMSA has published a list of the most serious incidents that occurred during October

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) informed that a total of forty five domestic commercial vessel incidents were reported in the month of October. Of these, seven were categorised as serious.

AMSA has published a list of the most serious incidents that occurred during October:
– A deck hand was bitten by sea snake while bringing in the nets. He could not be revived by emergency services.
– Vessel anchor rope become entangled in the propeller, damaging the rudder and seizing the motor, leaving the vessel disabled.
– A 10m yacht sank with 400 litres of diesel on-board. Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Australia assisted in the rescue of the crew.
– Vessel grounded causing damage to chain locker. A hull inspection revealed damage to the hull and bow stem.
– Collision between two vessels causing damage to Continue reading “AMSA has reported seven serious marine incidents in October”

Numerous lessons learned from US maritime casualties in 2017 as NTSB releases its annual report

US Coast Guard photo by Stasia Ellis
US Coast Guard photo by Stasia Ellis

The NTSB has published its 94 page Safer Seas digest annual report giving an overview of key lessons to be learned from a series of major maritime casualties.

NTSB has noted that many of the issues in last year’s report were recurring topics, including fatigue, poor bridge resource management, and distraction. The 41 marine accidents included in the report involved allisions, capsizings, collisions, fires, explosions, flooding, groundings, equipment damage, loss of life, injuries, and significant property damage.

The failure to maintain watertight integrity was the number one cause of Continue reading “Numerous lessons learned from US maritime casualties in 2017 as NTSB releases its annual report”

IMO has adopted a plan to address the issue of marine plastic rubbish

Dumping plastics into the sea is already prohibited under MARPOL regulations, which also oblige governments to ensure adequate port reception facilities to receive ship waste.
Dumping plastics into the sea is already prohibited under MARPOL regulations, which also oblige governments to ensure adequate port reception facilities to receive ship waste.

The IMO has pledged to address the significant problem posed by plastics to the marine environment, with the adoption of an action plan which aims to enhance existing regulations and introduce new supporting measures to reduce marine plastic litter from ships.

The plan was adopted on October 26 by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC).

Dumping plastics into the sea is already prohibited under MARPOL regulations, which also oblige governments to ensure adequate port reception facilities to receive ship waste. Under the London Convention and Protocol on the dumping of wastes at sea, only permitted materials can be dumped and this waste – such as from dredging – has to be fully assessed to ensure it does not contain harmful materials like plastics.

However, studies demonstrate that despite the existing regulatory framework to prevent marine plastic litter from ships, discharges into the sea continue to occur. Recognising that more Continue reading “IMO has adopted a plan to address the issue of marine plastic rubbish”

Preventing coal cargo from self-heating

The atmosphere in each cargo hold should be monitored, at least on a daily basis, for CO, hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), oxygen (O2) and flammable gas (LEL-methane).
The atmosphere in each cargo hold should be monitored, at least on a daily basis, for CO, hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), oxygen (O2) and flammable gas (LEL-methane).

London P&I Club has analysed the problems associated with the transportation of coal in bulk, such as self-heating and flammable gas (i.e. methane) release. Self-heating can lead to fires and the production of carbon monoxide (CO), whilst methane release can lead to an explosive atmosphere being generated in the hold.

Self-heating normally occurs in localised hot spots within a bulk cargo, and temperature measurements are unlikely to identify problems. However, when coal self-heats it produces CO, so measuring the concentration of CO is the most effective method to identify a self-heating cargo.

The atmosphere in each cargo hold should be monitored, at least on a daily basis, for CO, hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), oxygen (O2) and flammable gas (LEL-methane). If the holds are being ventilated, then ventilation should be stopped at least Continue reading “Preventing coal cargo from self-heating”

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