DNV GL publishes its review of marine fuel alternatives

Image courtesy of DNV GL
Image courtesy of DNV GL

Class society DNV GL has published an up-to-date assessment of the most promising alternative marine fuels available today. The study is timely, as the 2020 fuel sulfur cap is fast approaching and the IMO has just decided to aim for a 50 percent cut in shipping’s carbon emissions.

The paper examines the prospects for the full range of alternatives – LNG, LPG, methanol, biofuel, hydrogen, fuel cells, wind and battery technologies – and it compares them to the use of conventional fuel, both Continue reading “DNV GL publishes its review of marine fuel alternatives”

IMO adopts climate change strategy for shipping

Nations met at the United Nations International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London recently
Nations met at the United Nations International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London recently

Nations meeting at the United Nations International Maritime Organization (IMO) in London recently have adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships, setting out a vision to reduce GHG emissions from international shipping and phase them out, as soon as possible in this century.

The vision confirms IMO’s commitment to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and, as a matter of urgency, to phasing them out as soon as possible.

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Wind Propulsion is an Essential Tool in Shipping’s Decarbonisation Efforts says the International Windship Association

 Wind Propulsion is an Essential Tool in Shipping’s Decarbonisation Efforts
Wind Propulsion is an Essential Tool in Shipping’s Decarbonisation Efforts

The International Windship Association, along with its 40-plus member companies and organisations is positioned to help the shipping industry meet urgent and ambitious carbon reduction targets to be set by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) at MEPC72.

There is a wide range of wind-assist and primary wind propulsion technology solutions that offer between 10-30% savings for retrofits, and up to 50% on smaller new built fully optimised vessels. Wind is a primary renewable energy that is free at point of use, abundant and exclusively available giving the vessel better commercial and operational autonomy.

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Standard P&I Club issues a guide to fire safety on ferries

Standard P&I Club issues a guide to fire safety on ferries
Standard P&I Club issues a guide to fire safety on ferries

A fire is one of the most frightening things that can happen at sea. Often, seafarers have no ready access to the
emergency services when a fire breaks out and will need to rely on their own resources, courage and training to tackle and extinguish the blaze quickly to ensure the safety of the ship and everyone on board. To help Standard P&I Club has issued a guide to fire safety on ferries.

There are numerous causes of fire but the most relevant to ferries are:
– Electrical defects, such as overloaded electrical equipment, damaged cables and poorly formed connections. – Electrical faults in vehicles, especially when engines are hot/running. Reefer containers are major sources of fire.
– Mechanical failure, such as ignition from overheated bearings or a catastrophic engine failure.
– Uncontrolled release of oil or flammable liquid coming into contact with a hot surface, or the release of a low flashpoint fuel, such as petrol vapour, coming into contact with a source of ignition.
– Dry, readily combustible materials (such as wood, paper, textiles) coming into contact with an ignition source, such as a lighted cigarette, sparks or conducted heat from burning or cutting, highintensity lights or defective electrical equipment.

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Improper securing arrangement of sea strainer cover leads to vessel capsizing

Improper securing arrangement of sea strainer cover leads to vessel capsizing
Improper securing arrangement of sea strainer cover leads to vessel capsizing

Shipowners P&I Club has issued a case study about the capsizing of a vessel due to a loose port side sea strainer. Whilst double banked alongside another tug for four months awaiting a placement in dry dock, a harbour tug suddenly developed a list to port. Crew on board at the time quickly investigated to try and determine the point of water ingress, but struggled as the water level reached approximately 1 metre in height in the flooded engine room.

As the engine room crew tried to establish and stop the source of ingress, the deck crew were adjusting the mooring ropes to keep the vessel safely alongside as the vessel listed further to port. Eventually, the master took the decision to abandon the vessel as it was no longer safe to remain on board.

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