Nippon Paint Marine launches what it claims is the world’s first biocide free SPC antifouling

The technology adopts an advanced antifouling mechanism based around the anti-thrombogenic polymers used in the construction of artificial hearts and blood vessels in the medical sector.
The technology adopts an advanced antifouling mechanism based around the anti-thrombogenic polymers used in the construction of artificial hearts and blood vessels in the medical sector.

Japan-headquartered Nippon Paint Marine has introduced what is thought the world’s first biocide-free, low friction self-polishing copolymer (SPC) antifouling technology.

Aquaterras, a product name derived from the Japanese word for shining and the Latin for water – Shining Water – is an entirely new type of marine coating developed using neither biocide materials nor silicone.

Nippon Paint Marine Director John Drew said: “Typically ships’ antifouling paints have contained some form of biocide – copper, tributyltin, co-biocides. But the use of biocides today is strictly controlled by both national and international regulations such as the BPR in the EU. And while there are no immediate plans to further regulate the use of approved biocides, we cannot rule out the possibility that copper in antifouling will be regulated in the near future.

“Nippon Paint Marine has always looked to develop systems that go beyond the regulations. And with Aquaterras our chemists have achieved Continue reading “Nippon Paint Marine launches what it claims is the world’s first biocide free SPC antifouling”

All electric passenger vessel Future of The Fjords scoops top award

The highly innovative Future of the Fjords vessel has been recognised by winning the Ship of the Year 2018 Award
The highly innovative Future of the Fjords vessel has been recognised by winning the Ship of the Year 2018 Award

A revolutionary all electric passenger vessel operating in the Norwegian Fjords has won the Ship of the Year 2018 award at the SMM show.

Future of The Fjords was seen by awards organiser (Norwegian maritime magazine) Skipsrevyen, its readers and expert judging panel as marking a major leap forward in sustainable transport, both on the water and, potentially, on land.

The win represents something of a remarkable double victory. The owner of The Future of the Fjords together with the shipyard Brødrene Aa, has already won the title before back in 2016 with battery hybrid sister ship Vision of The Fjords.

Although both vessels share the same carbon fibre hull, Future of The Fjords was seen by awards organiser (Norwegian maritime Continue reading “All electric passenger vessel Future of The Fjords scoops top award”

USCG published towing vessel safety statistics for 2017

Photo credit: USCG
Photo credit: USCG

The US Coast Guard, in partnership with the American Waterways Operators (AWO), has published the National Quality Steering Committee’s annual safety report containing towing industry data for calendar years 1994 to 2017. The report reveals that in 2017, there were six operational towing vessel crew fatalities.

The National Quality Steering Committee looks at three safety measures to track overall trends in towing vessel safety and environmental protection: Crew fatalities per 100,000 towing industry workers, gallons of oil spilled from tank barges per million gallons transported, and the number of towing vessel casualties (overall and by incident severity).

The report also includes summary statistics on crewmember injuries, which the National Quality Steering Committee began tracking in 2006, for calendar years 2006 to 2017.

Crew Fatalities
In 2017, there were six operational towing vessel crew fatalities. While 13 deaths were Continue reading “USCG published towing vessel safety statistics for 2017”

Rudder compartment hull leak causes major capsizing of towing vessel says NTSB investigation

NTSB determines that the probable cause of the capsizing and sinking of the Gracie Claire was the towing vessel’s decreased stability and freeboard due to undetected flooding through a hull leak in the rudder compartment, which made the vessel susceptible to the adverse effects of boarding water from the wake of a passing vessel.
NTSB determines that the probable cause of the capsizing and sinking of the Gracie Claire was the towing vessel’s decreased stability and freeboard due to undetected flooding through a hull leak in the rudder compartment, which made the vessel susceptible to the adverse effects of boarding water from the wake of a passing vessel.

The US NTSB issued an investigation report on the capsizing of the towing vessel ‘Gracie Claire’, while moored on the Lower Mississippi River in Venice, Louisiana. The report revealed that several factors affecting the stability of the vessel led to its capsizing.

The incident
On 23 August 2017, at 0756, Gracie Claire was moored in Tiger Pass near mile marker 10 on the Lower Mississippi River. While taking on fuel and water, the towboat began to slowly list to starboard. After the wake of a passing crewboat washed onto the Gracie Claire’s stern, the list increased. In a short period of time, water entered an open door to the engine room and flooded the space.

The towboat sank partially, its bow being held above the water by the lines connected to the dock. All three crewmembers escaped to the dock without injury. Approximately 1,100 gallons of diesel fuel were discharged into the waterway. Damage to the Gracie Claire was estimated at $565,000.

Probable cause
NTSB determines that the probable cause of the capsizing and sinking of the Gracie Claire was the Continue reading “Rudder compartment hull leak causes major capsizing of towing vessel says NTSB investigation”

MPA Singapore has issued advice on how to conduct effective marine incident reporting

Once this is ensured, the owner, manager and shipmaster of the affected Singapore-registered ships should alert MPA of the incident immediately or at the latest, within 2 hours.
Once this is ensured, the owner, manager and shipmaster of the affected Singapore-registered ships should alert MPA of the incident immediately or at the latest, within 2 hours.

MPA Singapore issued a marine notice to inform operators of Singapore-registered ships on the procedure of reporting of any marine casualty, incident or security-related incident involving Singapore-registered ships.

To begin with, the following can be considered to-be-reported marine incidents:
– the death of, or serious injury to, a person;
– the loss of a person from a ship;
– the loss, presumed loss or abandonment of a ship;
– material damage to a ship;
– the stranding or disabling of a ship, or the involvement of a ship in a collision;
– material damage to marine infrastructure external to a ship, that could seriously endanger the safety of the ship, another ship or an individual; or
– severe damage to the environment, or the potential for severe damage to the environment, brought about by the damage of a ship or ships.

As noted, the general principle in any incident is that urgent steps on the ground, in accordance with ships’ and companies’ approved plans, must first be taken by Continue reading “MPA Singapore has issued advice on how to conduct effective marine incident reporting”

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