MAIB report into immobilisation and flooding of dredger Shearwater following repeated collisions published

At about 2000 on 9 April 2020, the UK registered dredger Shearwater was immobilised after its propeller shafts were fouled by a towline being used to tow the barge Agem One. The dredger and barge collided with each other repeatedly resulting in Shearwater being holed and flooded, before the towline parted and Agem One drifted away. There was no pollution or injury.

Shearwater had been towing Agem One in an alongside configuration on a coastal passage when a significant swell was encountered. This made the alongside tow untenable, causing Shearwater’s crew to switch to an astern tow. Within minutes of
switching, the 80m towline failed. Shortly after reconnecting the towline, it failed again, and the decision was made to abort the planned Continue reading “MAIB report into immobilisation and flooding of dredger Shearwater following repeated collisions published”

Dredger fire caused by oil contaminated insulation panels reveals FEBIMA report

Dredger fire caused by oil contaminated insulation panels reveals FEBIMA report
Dredger fire caused by oil contaminated insulation panels reveals FEBIMA report

The Federal Bureau for the Investigation of Maritime Accidents (FEBIMA) has published its investigation report into the circumstances surrounding a fire onboard the Trail Suction Hopper Dredger ‘UILENSPIEGEL’ whilst she was moored at Lisnave shipyard in Portugal during January 2021. The investigation has established that insulation panels contaminated with oil were installed during the re-assembly of the main engine after dry-dock.

On January 26th, 2021, Trail Suction Hopper Dredger UILENSPIEGEL was moored at pier 0 at Lisnave shipyard, Setubal, Portugal. The vessel was refloated again after a period in dry dock where maintenance had been carried out, including an overhaul of the vessel’s main engines. Continue reading “Dredger fire caused by oil contaminated insulation panels reveals FEBIMA report”

Cargo tank explosion and fire on chemical tanker Stolt Groenland report published

Cargo tank explosion and fire on chemical tanker Stolt Groenland report published
Cargo tank explosion and fire on chemical tanker Stolt Groenland report published

On 28 September 2019, a cargo tank containing styrene monomer on board the MAIC (Maritime Authority of the Cayman Islands) registered chemical tanker Stolt Groenland ruptured due to runaway polymerisation. The catastrophic rupture released a large quantity of vapour to the atmosphere, and it subsequently ignited. Fire-fighting efforts by the emergency services took over six hours and involved more than 700 personnel and 117 units of fire trucks, pumps and fire tugs.

The rupture of the styrene monomer tank resulted from a runaway polymerisation that was initiated by elevated temperatures caused by heat transfer from other chemical cargoes. The elevated temperatures caused the inhibitor, added to prevent the chemical’s polymerisation during the voyage, to deplete more rapidly than expected. Athough the styrene monomer had not been stowed directly adjacent to heated Continue reading “Cargo tank explosion and fire on chemical tanker Stolt Groenland report published”

Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published

Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published
Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published

The Japan Transport Safety Board (JTSB) has published its report into the death of a boatswain while the cargo vessel FIRST AI was mooring off Kyoto in September 2019 when his head was trapped in a hatch cover panel while performing hatch cover closing duty.

A master, Officer A, a chief engineer, a boatswain, and six other crew members boarded the Vessel. While the ship was mooring at Maizuru Port in Kyoto, at around 10:45 on September 9, 2019, Officer A and the boatswain began closing the hatch covers in preparation for departure after finishing the unloading tasks.

While visually checking the condition of the hatch cover on the port upper deck during the closing of the hatch cover, Officer A noticed that the rubber packing 2 for sealing the hatch cover near the Arm that had been temporarily repaired during the previous navigation had flaked. Hence, he instructed the boatswain, who was operating the closure at the hatch cover handling stand on the starboard side of the Continue reading “Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published”

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