AMSA has reported seven serious marine incidents in October

AMSA has published a list of the most serious incidents that occurred during October
AMSA has published a list of the most serious incidents that occurred during October

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) informed that a total of forty five domestic commercial vessel incidents were reported in the month of October. Of these, seven were categorised as serious.

AMSA has published a list of the most serious incidents that occurred during October:
– A deck hand was bitten by sea snake while bringing in the nets. He could not be revived by emergency services.
– Vessel anchor rope become entangled in the propeller, damaging the rudder and seizing the motor, leaving the vessel disabled.
– A 10m yacht sank with 400 litres of diesel on-board. Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Australia assisted in the rescue of the crew.
– Vessel grounded causing damage to chain locker. A hull inspection revealed damage to the hull and bow stem.
– Collision between two vessels causing damage to Continue reading “AMSA has reported seven serious marine incidents in October”

Preventing coal cargo from self-heating

The atmosphere in each cargo hold should be monitored, at least on a daily basis, for CO, hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), oxygen (O2) and flammable gas (LEL-methane).
The atmosphere in each cargo hold should be monitored, at least on a daily basis, for CO, hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), oxygen (O2) and flammable gas (LEL-methane).

London P&I Club has analysed the problems associated with the transportation of coal in bulk, such as self-heating and flammable gas (i.e. methane) release. Self-heating can lead to fires and the production of carbon monoxide (CO), whilst methane release can lead to an explosive atmosphere being generated in the hold.

Self-heating normally occurs in localised hot spots within a bulk cargo, and temperature measurements are unlikely to identify problems. However, when coal self-heats it produces CO, so measuring the concentration of CO is the most effective method to identify a self-heating cargo.

The atmosphere in each cargo hold should be monitored, at least on a daily basis, for CO, hydrogen sulphide (H2 S), oxygen (O2) and flammable gas (LEL-methane). If the holds are being ventilated, then ventilation should be stopped at least Continue reading “Preventing coal cargo from self-heating”

How to conduct a safe bunkering operation

A number of safe bunkering measures are required for each bunkering operation. These can be divided into four stages and checks
A number of safe bunkering measures are required for each bunkering operation. These can be divided into four stages and checks

The UK P&I Club has published helpful guidance to ensure safe bunkering operations. The Club said that bunkering operations are routine and critical, high risk operations which require to be carefully planned and performed.

Causes of bunker spills
Although the most of the bunker transfers are carried out without incident, very occasionally, things can and do go wrong. The UK Club notes that only a minority of cases do bunker spills occur because of failure of the hoses or pipelines, while the majority of spills result from a tank overflowing.

But these are not the only causes. Common causes of bunker spills can be summarised as follows:

– Improper set up of pipeline system valves: Potentially causing either overpressure, or flow of bunkers to an unintended location;
– Insufficient monitoring of tank levels during bunkering: All tanks, not only those Continue reading “How to conduct a safe bunkering operation”

Safety digest with twenty four case studies published by MAIB

The Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB), based in Southampton, UK, has published its latest safety digest that features 24 case studies of accidents and incidents it has investigated.

The information is published to inform the shipping and fishing industries, the pleasure craft community and the public of the general circumstances of marine accidents and to draw out the lessons to be learned. The sole purpose of the Safety Digest is to prevent similar accidents happening again. The content must necessarily be regarded as tentative and subject to alteration or correction if additional evidence becomes available. The articles do not assign fault or blame nor do they determine liability. The lessons often extend beyond the events of the incidents themselves to ensure the maximum value can be achieved.

In his introduction to the Safety Digest, Andrew Moll, MAIB (Interim) Chief Inspector of Marine Accidents says,
“Anyone who knows me will already be aware that I like simplicity. There is seldom anything simple about a marine accident, but to my mind there are usually three recurring components: an underlying weakness or vulnerability in the system (which includes the people); a trigger event or additional stressor Continue reading “Safety digest with twenty four case studies published by MAIB”

Maersk sets new guidelines on dangerous cargo stowage following Honam tragedy

The Risk Based Dangerous Goods Stowage principles have been developed to minimise risk to crew, cargo, environment and vessel in case a fire develops. The different container vessel designs were reviewed from a risk mitigation perspective and ultimately six different risk zones defined.
The Risk Based Dangerous Goods Stowage principles have been developed to minimise risk to crew, cargo, environment and vessel in case a fire develops. The different container vessel designs were reviewed from a risk mitigation perspective and ultimately six different risk zones defined.

In the aftermath of the major fire that killed five crew members onboard the ‘Maersk Honam’ in March 2018, Danish container ship giant Maersk has conducted a thorough review of their current safety practices and policies with reference to the stowage of dangerous cargo. Consequently, Maersk has now announced the implementation of new guidelines to improve safety across its container vessel fleet.

On 6 March 2018, the container ship ‘Maersk Honam’ suffered a serious fire in its cargo hold where dangerous goods were carried, but up to this time, there is no evidence to suggest that dangerous goods caused the fire, the company noted. In addition, all cargo was accepted as per the requirements of the IMDG Code and stowed onboard the vessel accordingly.

Following the tragic incident, Maersk took measures and implemented additional preliminary guidelines for stowage of dangerous goods. The company evaluated over 3,000 UN numbers of hazardous materials in order to further understand and improve dangerous cargo stowage onboard container vessels and developed a new set of principles called ‘Risk Based Dangerous Goods Stowage’.

Together with ABS, Maersk called for a workshop with other industry stakeholders to conduct a Continue reading “Maersk sets new guidelines on dangerous cargo stowage following Honam tragedy”

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