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New requirements for authorized service providers under new IMO requirements

DNV GL has announced that IMO has introduced new requirements for the maintenance, examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, relevant for shipyards, suppliers, owners/managers, flag states of all ship types. From 1 January 2020, personnel carrying out maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing overhaul and repair of the following items shall be certified by an authorized service provider:

Lifeboats (including free-fall lifeboats), rescue boats and fast rescue boats
Launching appliances as well as on-load and off-load release gear for lifeboats, rescue boats, fast rescue boats and davit-launched life rafts
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MAIB issues report and safety flyer about gas explosions on general cargo ship Nortrader

Nortrader alongside with damaged hatch covers following the gas explosions
Nortrader alongside with damaged hatch covers following the gas explosions

On 13 January, at 1447, Nortrader, anchored off Plymouth with a cargo of unprocessed incinerator bottom ash (U-IBA), suffered 2 explosions in quick succession. The first explosion was in the forecastle store and the second in the cargo hold. The chief engineer, in the forecastle store at the time, suffered second degree burns requiring 4 months to recover. The vessel suffered extensive damage putting it out of service for over 3 months.

Safety lessons
Sea transportation of a cargo that was not included in the schedule of authorised cargoes of the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes (IMSBC) Code
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Future-proofing through training – The Nautical Institute Command Seminars

Training and professional development needs to be addressed at the highest level if we are to continue to improve maritime safety, concluded attendees at The Nautical Institute’s 2017 Command Seminar series.

At the most recent event, held in Cyprus, attendees emphasised that it is important to ensure continuity in the maritime profession, making sure that seafarers make the most of new technology, while maintaining existing skills and knowledge. “New technologies will be used to support the Master’s decision, but mentoring and training need to be intensified in the new context of digitalisation,” said speaker Captain Alexander Legowski of OL Shipping.

Over the course of 2017, more than 500 people from a broad spectrum across the industry, from cadets to sailing Masters and senior industry figures, have attended The Nautical Institute’s five Command Seminars. The seminars were based around the theme of navigation accidents and their causes, looking in some detail at how the industry can best cope with the changes expected over the next 15 years. Continue reading “Future-proofing through training – The Nautical Institute Command Seminars”

New resolution for inspection of holds and tanks

Local correspondents’ Pandi Liquidadores S.R.L, have submitted an update to the UK P&I Club regarding the new SENASA resolution for the inspection of holds and tanks in Argentina.

The inspection of holds and tanks has been a longstanding problem within the industry, especially when an official inspection was required by the National Food and Grain Health Authority (SENASA), UK P&I Club states.

These problems have been a major concern of the new Authorities of SENASA who came into office at the beginning of 2016 and Continue reading “New resolution for inspection of holds and tanks”

UK P&I Club comments on the increase in engine room damage caused by refinery catalytic fines

UK P&I Club has noticed an increase in engine room damage caused by refinery catalytic fines
UK P&I Club has noticed an increase in engine room damage caused by refinery catalytic fines

Refinery catalytic fines in marine fuel oil are not a new problem, however according to the UK P&I Club, there appears to have been an increase in the frequency of engine damage caused by these highly abrasive particles.

As explained, refineries use catalysts to improve the yield of high value products, such as gasoline, refined from crude oil. Unfortunately, some of these fine particles escape into side stream products that are used as blend components in the production of residual grades of marine fuel. This particulate matter, comprising of aluminium and silicon oxides, is extremely hard and, if entrained in the fuel as it enters engines, can cause severe abrasive wear.

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