World’s first autonomous and electric container ship is one step closer to launch as yard is chosen

The world’s first autonomous and electric container ship is one step closer to launch, with Norwegian agricultural company Yara signing a deal with Vard worth approximately NOK 250 million ($30 million) to build the vessel.

Vard will deliver the 120-TEU Yara Birkeland for launch in early 2020 from its Brevik yard in Norway, and the vessel will gradually move from manned operation to fully autonomous operation by 2022. The hull will be delivered from Vard Braila in Romania.

The project was initiated in an effort to improve the logistics at Yara’s Porsgrunn fertilizer plant. Every day, more than 100 diesel truck journeys are needed to transport products from Yara’s Porsgrunn plant to ports in Brevik and Larvik where the company ships products to Continue reading “World’s first autonomous and electric container ship is one step closer to launch as yard is chosen”

World’s first ocean going solar powered superyacht set to be unveiled

Swiss company SolarImpact Yacht AG has announced plans to debut its new project. What is believed to be the world’s first ocean-going solar superyacht, which has been in the research phase for five years, is now ready to be unveiled to the world.

The 23.7-metre (78-foot) vessel, designed by Marlena Ratajska, draws power from a solar-based energy supply and uses optimised SWATH (Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull) construction. The concept merges top-end luxury features and comforts with cutting-edge design and sustainability, and can reportedly boast an unlimited cruising range.

SolarImpact Yacht AG’s technological marvels will be unveiled at Cannes Yachting Festival 2018 (at Palais stand 089), and visitors to the Continue reading “World’s first ocean going solar powered superyacht set to be unveiled”

Wärtsilä’s divers make the need for unscheduled dry-dockings avoidable

Vessels’ repair needs do not always match with planned maintenance schedules. With specialist underwater teams, no vessel is far from fast, high-quality repair and refurbishment that enable operators to avoid the potential loss of income related to dry-docking.

As the first global operator in the underwater services market, the technology group Wärtsilä is uniquely positioned to offer marine service and maintenance, regardless of the vessel’s location. Maintenance and repair services performed by specialist divers add to Wärtsilä’s comprehensive service offering and allow for operators to minimise or eliminate vessel downtime.

“Reduced fuel consumption, efficiency improvements, and higher utilisation rates are always on the top of operators’ agenda. With our in-house specialist teams of certified diver technicians and propulsion experts, we are equipped to offer our customers underwater services Continue reading “Wärtsilä’s divers make the need for unscheduled dry-dockings avoidable”

Maud makes a welcome return to her homeland in Norway after 100 years

Image courtesy of Maud Returns Home
Image courtesy of Maud Returns Home

Maud, the ship that Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen tried to reach the North Pole with, returned to Norway on Monday after nearly a century.

The vessel arrived in Bergen, where she spent two days back in July 1918 on her way to the high Arctic.

Maud was raised from the seabed in Cambridge Bay, Canada, over the summer of 2016 by the Maud Returns Home project.

Named for Queen Maud of Norway, she was built for Amundsen’s second expedition to the Arctic and launched in June 1916. In the summer of 1918, Amundsen departed Norway. His ambition was to sail into the high north and deliberately get stuck in the ice so the ship Continue reading “Maud makes a welcome return to her homeland in Norway after 100 years”

Cargo must be stowed according to approved arrangements says AMSA

All cargo, whether carried on or under deck, should be stowed and secured in accordance with the vessel’s Cargo Securing Manual as approved under Regulation 5.6 of Chapter VI of the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention.
All cargo, whether carried on or under deck, should be stowed and secured in accordance with the vessel’s Cargo Securing Manual as approved under Regulation 5.6 of Chapter VI of the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention.

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority has published a marine notice, reminding vessel owners, operators, masters and surveyors of the importance of stowing cargo in accordance with the approved arrangements and regulations.

All cargo, whether carried on or under deck, should be stowed and secured in accordance with the vessel’s Cargo Securing Manual as approved under Regulation 5.6 of Chapter VI of the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention. This includes the way in which cargo is secured and the weight distribution of cargo within the stow.

In Australia, Chapter VI of the SOLAS Convention is given effect through Marine Order 42 (Carriage, stowage and securing of cargoes and containers) 2016.

AMSA has experienced incidents in recent years in which the Continue reading “Cargo must be stowed according to approved arrangements says AMSA”

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