Incorrect oxygen welding gas hose led to fire

The hose had been recently replaced, but the replacement hose was a hydraulic oil service hose with oxygen fittings.
The hose had been recently replaced, but the replacement hose was a hydraulic oil service hose with oxygen fittings.

In its latest Safety Flashes, IMCA presents a case of a fire due to incorrectly selected oxygen welding gas hose, during a routine cutting job onboard a ship. There were no injuries or ship damage, but investigation later revealed that the hose had been recently replaced with one that did not comply with ISO 14113 specification.

The incident
The ship’s welder opened the Oxygen and Acetylene gas bottle valves in order to do a cutting job on deck. These gas bottles were attached to the vessel’s integrated welding gas system. Opening the valve on the Oxygen bottle caused an explosion to a short, high pressure hose delivering oxygen from the bottle to the oxygen gas regulator. The end of the hose caught fire and was quickly extinguished by turning off the oxygen bottle. Nobody was injured and the only damage was to the hose that completely separated.

Findings
The hose had been recently replaced, but the replacement hose was a hydraulic oil service hose with oxygen fittings. The replacement hose was not Continue reading “Incorrect oxygen welding gas hose led to fire”

British Marine issues statement following cancellation of 2019 London Boat Show

British Marine, which organises and owns the London Boat Show, has announced that the 2019 Show, due to run at ExCeL London from 9-13 January 2019, will not take place.
British Marine, which organises and owns the London Boat Show, has announced that the 2019 Show, due to run at ExCeL London from 9-13 January 2019, will not take place.

British Marine, which organises and owns the London Boat Show, has announced that the 2019 Show, due to run at ExCeL London from 9-13 January 2019, will not take place.

This decision was made after independent research by exhibition experts, Zing Insights, showed there was insufficient support from a large proportion of the marine industry to the London Boat Show with its current format, duration and location.

In the last three weeks, Zing Insights has carried out personal interviews with over 67% of exhibitors. This revealed that whilst a number of marine companies supported the change to a five day Show, finding it preferable to a 10 day Show, a large number of key exhibitors were not prepared to commit to exhibiting to a five day Show at ExCeL in January 2019.

Continue reading “British Marine issues statement following cancellation of 2019 London Boat Show”

Sinking raises safety issues on bilge alarms

The failure of engine cooling system pipework is one of the most common causes of flooding on small fishing vessels
The failure of engine cooling system pipework is one of the most common causes of flooding on small fishing vessels

In its latest Safety Digest, the UK MAIB provides learnins about an 8.13m fibreglass fishing vessel that was engaged in picking up its fleets of creels when it began to take on water and subsequently sank. The skipper, who was working alone, managed to deploy the boat’s liferaft and climb into it as the boat was sinking and was later rescued without injuries.

The incident
The skipper went out to sea shortly after daybreak to recover his two fleets of creels. The weather was good. As soon as he arrived at the fishing grounds, he hauled in the first fleet of creels and stowed it on the aft end of the deck. He then headed at speed toward the second fleet of creels.

Continue reading “Sinking raises safety issues on bilge alarms”

INTERCARGO Bulk Carrier Casualty report published

INTERCARGO has published its Bulk Carrier Casualty report that analyses bulk carrier casualties over the period from 2008 to 2017
INTERCARGO has published its Bulk Carrier Casualty report that analyses bulk carrier casualties over the period from 2008 to 2017

INTERCARGO has published its Bulk Carrier Casualty report that analyses bulk carrier casualties over the period from 2008 to 2017. The report revealed that 53 bulk carriers over 10,000 dwt have been identified as total losses over that period with cargo shift and liquefaction remaining a great concern.

In 2017, the tragic losses of ‘Stellar Daisy’ carrying an iron ore cargo and ‘Emerald Star’ with a nickel ore cargo raised questions of structural integrity and safety condition of high density cargoes carried onboard. These two bulk carrier casualties caused the loss of 32 seafarers, the highest annual loss of lives since 2011.

As the report reveals, 9 casualties of suspected cargo failure consisted of 6 bulk carriers carrying nickel ore from Indonesia, 2 vessels with Continue reading “INTERCARGO Bulk Carrier Casualty report published”

Are ‘Smart Bolts’ the thing of the future?

Intelligent wireless bolts in wind turbines or satellites may be able to let the operator know when something is wrong
Intelligent wireless bolts in wind turbines or satellites may be able to let the operator know when something is wrong

In the future, intelligent wireless bolts in wind turbines or satellites may be able to let the operator know when something is wrong. This could reduce the risk of human injuries and save cost.

A research team at NTNU in Gjøvik is working to create bolts that send an alert when something is not as it should be or when maintenance is needed. Each bolt must be able to contact a control center, which will receive messages from all intelligent bolts of this type in all installations around the world.

The team working on these wireless bolts includes Professor Michael Cheffena, two fellows and the manufacturer Dokka Fasteners. The vision of the research team is to develop wireless sensors to be installed inside the bolts. If the sensors detect that something is Continue reading “Are ‘Smart Bolts’ the thing of the future?”

Latest Tweets from the IIMS