CRT to create regional teams to improve customer service and engage with local communities

Richard Parry, CRT CEO (pictured right)
Richard Parry, CRT CEO (pictured right)

Canal & River Trust will move resource from its centrally based roles into its six regional customer-facing teams to improve customer service and engage with local communities.

The changes will be made as part of the trust’s waterways and well being strategy and will see operational management roles adapted to meet the requirements of the new regions.

Richard Parry, CEO, commented: “The Trust has been repositioning as a charity for the waterways and well being, with a new structure that has seen us move from ten waterways to six larger regions, with some activities previously managed centrally now devolved to these regional teams, and a reduction in senior manager numbers overall.

Continue reading “CRT to create regional teams to improve customer service and engage with local communities”

Environment Agency set to increase boat charges

The EA is the second largest navigation authority in the UK and is responsible for more than 1,000km of navigable waterways.
The EA is the second largest navigation authority in the UK and is responsible for more than 1,000km of navigable waterways.

The Environment Agency is to increase the cost of boat registrations on its waterways from 2019 which it says will help ensure a sustainable service and cover maintenance.

It said that the new charges for 2019-21 will be invested in waterways enjoyed by around 29,000 boat users, helping to meet the shortfall between the cost of running the service and the income currently generated from annual boat registrations.

“We realise an increase in charges is never welcome news but it is essential to keep the levels of service and maintenance which boaters tell us is needed,” said Mark Ormrod, EA national manager for navigation.

“In addition, we are exploring new income streams to make our Continue reading “Environment Agency set to increase boat charges”

Cley Harbour rejuvenated after many years of disuse

Photo credit: Chris Taylor
Photo credit: Chris Taylor

Norfolk’s Cley Harbour has received its largest traditional working sailing vessel for more than 60 years, marking its return to activity after falling into disuse.

The Coastal Exploration Company owned 30ft open wooden gaff rigged whelk boat Salford came into the harbour to deliver a cargo of North Norfolk beer from Barsham Brewery to the Cley Windmill.

Simon Read, chairman of Cley Harbour committee said: “This is the largest traditional working sailing vessel to visit Cley in over 60 years and will be mark a key moment in the rejuvenation of Cley Harbour.”

The clinker-built traditional Norfolk fishing boat has remained in and around Norfolk’s waters since it was built in the 1950s and was recently in the filming of Continue reading “Cley Harbour rejuvenated after many years of disuse”

Workboat apprenticeship scheme tackles skills and crewing challenges

Training providers including 54 North Maritime and Red Ensign are drawing up plans to run courses for the scheme
Training providers including 54 North Maritime and Red Ensign are drawing up plans to run courses for the scheme

The National Workboat Association (NWA) has finalised its Workboat Crewmember Apprenticeship standard as the industry faces growing skills and crewing challenges in the thriving workboat sector.

This scheme is aimed at addressing industry concerns about falling numbers of young people entering the industry at ground level, exasperated by experienced seafarers leaving the industry, often by retirement.

As well as tugs and ‘multicat’-type vessels the definition of workboat in this context includes: offshore wind personnel transfer vessels, survey craft and pilot vessels, all sectors experiencing growth involving increasingly sophisticated and technically demanding vessels but still requiring seamanship skills that have been around for generations. The new apprenticeship standard has now been finalised, paving the way for the scheme to be rolled out by training providers across England and Wales.

The Workboat Crewmember Standard and assessment has been Continue reading “Workboat apprenticeship scheme tackles skills and crewing challenges”

How to conduct a safe bunkering operation

A number of safe bunkering measures are required for each bunkering operation. These can be divided into four stages and checks
A number of safe bunkering measures are required for each bunkering operation. These can be divided into four stages and checks

The UK P&I Club has published helpful guidance to ensure safe bunkering operations. The Club said that bunkering operations are routine and critical, high risk operations which require to be carefully planned and performed.

Causes of bunker spills
Although the most of the bunker transfers are carried out without incident, very occasionally, things can and do go wrong. The UK Club notes that only a minority of cases do bunker spills occur because of failure of the hoses or pipelines, while the majority of spills result from a tank overflowing.

But these are not the only causes. Common causes of bunker spills can be summarised as follows:

– Improper set up of pipeline system valves: Potentially causing either overpressure, or flow of bunkers to an unintended location;
– Insufficient monitoring of tank levels during bunkering: All tanks, not only those Continue reading “How to conduct a safe bunkering operation”

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