British Ports Association rolls out its sustainability charter

The British Ports Association (BPA) has published its new sustainable development charter which commits to supporting the dual aims of a strong and healthy environment and a thriving economy.

Astonishingly, 90 percent of the UK population lives within 30 miles of the coast, and no part of the UK is more than 70 miles from it. The Charter notes action underway for shoreside power with some British ports having already installed shoreside power for smaller vessels such as fishing boats and leisure craft. For the majority of ports, particularly those handling large vessels such as cruise ships and large cargo vessels, the installation cost is currently prohibitively high. However, all major ports in England (and many others in the rest of the Continue reading “British Ports Association rolls out its sustainability charter”

MCA propose a new code of practice to allow pleasure vessels to be temporarily used for business purposes and as race support boats

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) is seeking feedback from the public on a new code of practice for intended pleasure vessels (IPV)

The MCA would like feedback on a new proposal to allow pleasure craft to be temporarily used for business purposes and has race support boats.

The organisation has been working with British Marine, RYA, and the Yacht Brokers, Designers and Surveyors Association (YBDSA) to develop the new code of practice which is due to be published on 1 January 2019.

The code is divided into parts. The first refers to intended pleasure vessels (IPV) to be used for temporary commercial reasons and the second for said craft to be used to support race boats.

Continue reading “MCA propose a new code of practice to allow pleasure vessels to be temporarily used for business purposes and as race support boats”

Lively Lady back on the water after refit 50 years on from her global circumnavigation

Classic yacht Lively Lady is back in the water 50 years after her first single-handed global circumnavigation, following a full repaint and extensive refit at Hayling Yacht Company.

The refit work to restore the 36ft cutter was carried out by volunteers from the charity Around and Around and included replacing the deck, reassembling the wheelhouse, installing new electrics and an interior refit, alongside a repaint using Jotun Yachting paint products.

“The hard work carried out by the volunteers at Around and Around has certainly paid off, with Lively Lady looking better than new and in a condition which will see her through the next 50 years,” said Jim Brickwood, business development manager at Jotun Yachting UK.

Continue reading “Lively Lady back on the water after refit 50 years on from her global circumnavigation”

River Canal Rescue reports a record number of emergency call-outs

River Canal Rescue has responded to a record number of call-outs this summer.

From June 1 to July 31 the breakdown and emergency assistance firm responded to 902 call-outs and undertook 223 major rescues or repair jobs.

During the same period last year, there were 833 call-outs and 208 major rescues or repairs.

One of its recent major rescues – on July 20 – was to raise a 70ft narrowboat from Macclesfield Canal.

The boat sank in lock nine of Bosley’s 12 lock flight after appearing to have got caught on the lock gate cill. It was the owners first day out on their first boat.

Continue reading “River Canal Rescue reports a record number of emergency call-outs”

Warilda: The Hospital ship sinking that shocked the nation remembered 100 years on

His Majesty's Australian Transport (HMAT) Warilda was transporting hundreds of wounded soldiers from the French port of Le Havre to Southampton
His Majesty’s Australian Transport (HMAT) Warilda was transporting hundreds of wounded soldiers from the French port of Le Havre to Southampton

A Southampton-based maritime charity will lower its flag to half-mast today (3 August) to commemorate the sinking of hospital ship (HMAT) Warilda 100 years ago, which caused outrage across the nation when it was torpedoed in the English Channel, killing 123 people.

His Majesty’s Australian Transport (HMAT) Warilda was transporting hundreds of wounded soldiers from the French port of Le Havre to Southampton when, despite being clearly marked with the Red Cross, it was struck by a single torpedo from a German U-boat.
Upon impact the ship’s starboard propeller was disabled, the engine room flooded and the steering gear obliterated. Unable to steer, the Warilda continued moving in a circle at 15 knots – making it difficult for those on board to escape in lifeboats.

The ship remained afloat for almost two hours before sinking into the channel.

Survivors were taken to Continue reading “Warilda: The Hospital ship sinking that shocked the nation remembered 100 years on”

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