UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea

UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea
UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea

As accidents involving dangerous goods continue to occur with regularity at sea, the UK P&I Club has published a comprehensive guide running to more than 100 pages to support operators who pack dangerous goods into cargo units for onward transportation by sea.

As part of the new guide, UK P&I Club makes the following points and advice:
– Improper packing practices and loads not properly secured increase the number of accidents across the supply chain and have as a result caused damages, loss and injuries, both on land and at sea.
– There is a lack of guidance regarding personnel working in the cargo handling industry. That is where the Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTU) becomes relevant. The CTU provides information regarding packing cargo in containers, in order to comply with the requirements of sea and land transport.
– Classification of dangerous goods: The first key task for an operator is to make sure that the dangerous goods on board have the correct UN classification.
– Selection of Continue reading “UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea”

Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold’s bilge system to minimise claims

Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold bilge systems to minimise claims
Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold bilge systems to minimise claims

The UK P&I Club has reminded those working in the marine industry that significant insurance damage claims can result if a bulk cargo is damaged due to the leakage of the bilge system into a loaded bulk cargo hold.

To reduce the chance of such cargo damage, operators and surveyors are advised to inspect and test the cargo hold bilge system as part of the routine pre-loading checks of the cargo holds.

Inspection and testing of cargo hold bilge system non-return valves should be included in routine pre-loading checks of the holds. These non-return valves may not be seated tightly, because of the Continue reading “Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold’s bilge system to minimise claims”

Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design

Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design
Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design

Automation presents a set of unique challenges to designers, insurers and operators of ships. In this article, reprinted from the Shipowners P&I Club website Keir Gravil, a naval architect at Frazer-Nash Consultancy in Bristol, UK discusses some of the key issues that could face automated ships of the future from a design perspective.

It is a truth recognised by many industries that the future of transportation lies with greater automation. Over the last 50 years we have seen huge changes not only in shipping, but in every form of transportation and vehicle. Aircraft now incorporate automation routinely on flights around the world, cars are being developed to drive themselves and many railways have been totally automated for some time. As each step in the evolution of transportation progresses, the human element of control is reduced or eliminated altogether. But what of shipping? Surely an industry the size and scope of international shipping faces unique challenges in the realm of automation?

The background
It is often the job of ship designers, especially those in the naval defence industry, to think ahead and anticipate future technological changes. One could argue that Continue reading “Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design”

Improper maintenance could have cost the lives of two surveyors says UK P&I Club case study

Photo credit: UK P&I Club
Photo credit: UK P&I Club

In UK P&I Club’s latest ‘Lessons Learned’ series of case studies, Captain David Nichol presents the case regarding improper ventilation after a maintenance operation, which could have led to the deaths of two surveyors during a third party survey on the emergency fire pump.

About the incident
During a third party survey, the surveyor made a request to test the emergency fire pump, which was arranged with the assistance of the chief engineer. The emergency fire pump was located in a recessed well in the steering gear compartment, approximately 3 metres deep and accessed by an inclined stairway. At the start of the test, the surveyor asked to observe the pump being started locally and operating before proceeding on deck to check the hoses rigged fore and aft.

Shortly after descending into the fire pump well, the chief engineer urgently ordered the surveyors to get out and by the time both men reached the steering compartment deck, they were Continue reading “Improper maintenance could have cost the lives of two surveyors says UK P&I Club case study”

Cargo damage caused by leaking hatch covers

Cargo damage caused by leaking hatch covers
Cargo damage caused by leaking hatch covers

The Swedish P&I Club has described the case of cargo damage on a bulk carrier caused by water ingress, as a result of the poor condition of hatch covers.

The incident
The bulk carrier had seven cargo holds which had been fully loaded with soybeans. The vessel had side rolling cargo hatch covers. For six days, the vessel encountered heavy weather of force 9 on the Beaufort scale, causing the vessel to pitch and roll heavily. The cargo hatch covers were repeatedly washed over by seawater.

All hatch covers were opened when the vessel was at anchor and waiting for an available berth. This was to ensure the vessel was gas free since fumigation had been carried out in all cargo holds at the loading port. When the cargo hatch covers were removed, it was found that Continue reading “Cargo damage caused by leaking hatch covers”