Standard P&I Club issues a guide to fire safety on ferries

Standard P&I Club issues a guide to fire safety on ferries
Standard P&I Club issues a guide to fire safety on ferries

A fire is one of the most frightening things that can happen at sea. Often, seafarers have no ready access to the
emergency services when a fire breaks out and will need to rely on their own resources, courage and training to tackle and extinguish the blaze quickly to ensure the safety of the ship and everyone on board. To help Standard P&I Club has issued a guide to fire safety on ferries.

There are numerous causes of fire but the most relevant to ferries are:
– Electrical defects, such as overloaded electrical equipment, damaged cables and poorly formed connections. – Electrical faults in vehicles, especially when engines are hot/running. Reefer containers are major sources of fire.
– Mechanical failure, such as ignition from overheated bearings or a catastrophic engine failure.
– Uncontrolled release of oil or flammable liquid coming into contact with a hot surface, or the release of a low flashpoint fuel, such as petrol vapour, coming into contact with a source of ignition.
– Dry, readily combustible materials (such as wood, paper, textiles) coming into contact with an ignition source, such as a lighted cigarette, sparks or conducted heat from burning or cutting, highintensity lights or defective electrical equipment.

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Improper securing arrangement of sea strainer cover leads to vessel capsizing

Improper securing arrangement of sea strainer cover leads to vessel capsizing
Improper securing arrangement of sea strainer cover leads to vessel capsizing

Shipowners P&I Club has issued a case study about the capsizing of a vessel due to a loose port side sea strainer. Whilst double banked alongside another tug for four months awaiting a placement in dry dock, a harbour tug suddenly developed a list to port. Crew on board at the time quickly investigated to try and determine the point of water ingress, but struggled as the water level reached approximately 1 metre in height in the flooded engine room.

As the engine room crew tried to establish and stop the source of ingress, the deck crew were adjusting the mooring ropes to keep the vessel safely alongside as the vessel listed further to port. Eventually, the master took the decision to abandon the vessel as it was no longer safe to remain on board.

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Recent research findings highlight issues with dirty engine room bilges

Recent research findings highlight issues with dirty engine room bilges
Recent research findings highlight issues with dirty engine room bilges

Recent analysis of the Shipowners Club’s Condition Survey Programme has highlighted that approximately 25% of the vessels surveyed showed evidence of contaminated engine room bilges. As such, Shipowners Club seeks to raise awareness of the potential fire hazards associated with oily engine room bilges and the checks and steps that a ship’s crew and/or surveyor should undertake.

Whilst an oily bilge may not be the immediate source of a fire, any fire that arises in an engine room or machinery space has the potential to escalate and spread rapidly. The presence of oil accumulated in bilges or drip trays act as additional fuel to sustain burning and increase the likelihood of the fire reaching further areas.

With respect to these, the Club notes the following:

– Bilges, especially in the engine room, should be kept clean and free of oil at all times and chemical cleaning should be completed periodically.
– Operators should paint engine room bilges a Continue reading “Recent research findings highlight issues with dirty engine room bilges”

Ships carrying heavy fuel oil cargoes subject to ongoing condition surveys

Libya releases tanker carrying fuel to rival government
Libya releases tanker carrying fuel to rival government

In order to improve ship standards, the International Group of P&I Clubs has said it will continue to conduct survey triggers for seagoing vessels of 10 years of age or more carrying heavy fuel oil cargoes.

As a result, all sea-going vessels that are 10 years old or more and have carried heavy fuel oil as cargo within the previous 12 months will be subject to condition survey, unless:

– The vessel has undergone a P&I club condition survey during the previous 12 months.
– The vessel has undergone a Special Survey during the previous 6 months.
– The vessel has a valid Condition Assessment Program (CAP) rating of 1 or 2 with a classification society having membership in the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS).

Operators should have in mind that a declaration is now required so that Continue reading “Ships carrying heavy fuel oil cargoes subject to ongoing condition surveys”

UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea

UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea
UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea

As accidents involving dangerous goods continue to occur with regularity at sea, the UK P&I Club has published a comprehensive guide running to more than 100 pages to support operators who pack dangerous goods into cargo units for onward transportation by sea.

As part of the new guide, UK P&I Club makes the following points and advice:
– Improper packing practices and loads not properly secured increase the number of accidents across the supply chain and have as a result caused damages, loss and injuries, both on land and at sea.
– There is a lack of guidance regarding personnel working in the cargo handling industry. That is where the Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTU) becomes relevant. The CTU provides information regarding packing cargo in containers, in order to comply with the requirements of sea and land transport.
– Classification of dangerous goods: The first key task for an operator is to make sure that the dangerous goods on board have the correct UN classification.
– Selection of Continue reading “UK P&I Club releases a detailed guidance report on packing dangerous goods for carriage by sea”

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