New Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion

The leading worldwide professional body for marine surveying, the International Institute of Marine Surveying, has launched a standalone professional qualification in marine corrosion. The qualification comprises 10 modules and is offered separately from the Institute’s two award-winning professional qualifications in marine surveying.

The course that supports the qualification is entitled ‘Marine Corrosion and Prevention in Small Vessels, Ships and Offshore Structures‘.

The programme has been written primarily with marine surveyors in mind, those whose job it is to inspect, understand and report on corrosion and is pitched at education level 4/5.

Who should study for this qualification?

The professional qualification in marine corrosion is intended for marine surveyors of yachts and small craft, ships and offshore structures. It is also relevant for design engineers, material specifiers, other professional engineers and students of marine science and engineering.

IIMS Chief Executive Officer, Mike Schwarz, said, “IIMS has made a significant investment to bring the Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion to market. This is one of the most important new initiatives from the Institute since the award-winning IIMS Diploma in marine surveying was launched 20 years ago. Corrosion remains the one aspect of marine surveying where knowledge is vital. It is apparent that many people still have an insufficient depth of knowledge about corrosion and I expect this Professional Qualification will appeal to many.”

More information and a detailed Prospectus are available at http://bit.ly/39PG3qG.

IIMS launches a standalone Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion

The Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion sets a new standard
The Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion sets a new standard

After many months of detailed product development, the International Institute of Marine Surveying (IIMS) is pleased to announce the launch of a new standalone, affordable professional qualification in marine corrosion – subtitled marine corrosion and prevention in small vessels, ships and offshore structure. Prospectus for the Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion

The programme has been written primarily with marine surveyors in mind, those whose job it is to inspect, understand and report on corrosion. The new Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion is pitched at education level 4.

The developer and content producer behind this new qualification is Mike Lewus, a name known to some members as he has presented at various IIMS events and seminars. Mike has an encyclopaedic knowledge of corrosion and has spent many years as a technical lead with the British Stainless Steel Association.

Continue reading “IIMS launches a standalone Professional Qualification in Marine Corrosion”

Handy Guide number 26 published by the Institute

The handy guide, ‘What a marine surveyor needs to know about metacentric stability, the inclining experiment, heel and rolling tests’, authored by Elliott Berry FIIMS, covers an area that for many marine surveyors remains something of a dark art. Yet understanding stability and its theory as well as in practical terms as to why a vessel floats is something all surveyors must understand fully.

The handy guide is presented in four distinct parts:
Part 1 – The inclining experiment
Part 2 – A typical inclining experiment report for a steel yacht
Part 3 – An approximate determination of a small vessel’s stability by means of the rolling period tests
Part 4 – The statical stability and stability criteria

An experienced practicing marine surveying practitioner, Elliott presents the theory using a number of formulae backed by helpful diagrams and illustrations to show what the marine surveyor should do and be aware of when conducting inclining experiments and heel tests. Continue reading “Handy Guide number 26 published by the Institute”

Remembering the novelty of face-to-face training

Do you recall those days when we used to get together in a room to do some face-to-face training and networking? It seems an age ago already with Zoom and Teams taking over as the was to train. So, imagine my angst when the planned 7 day practical course at the Boat Building Academy in Lyme Regis, which had been under development for more than a year, was placed in jeopardy by the pandemic. It was unclear if we could run the event safely until just a couple of weeks prior. But I am delighted to say we managed to get the course away with a reduced number of 6 students.

I spent a day with the students – social distancing and other sensible pandemic measures were in place naturally. As I write, the course has just one more day to run, including Continue reading “Remembering the novelty of face-to-face training”

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