IIMS forms an Inland Waterways Working Group and announces first training event

In response to interest expressed recently by IIMS members, a decision has been taken to form a new inland waterways group. IIMS member, Chris Williams, has agreed to head up the group (supported by several others) under the auspices of Large Yacht & Small Craft Working Group Chairman, John Excell. The initial intention of the group is to meet formally twice a year for training days around the UK and to communicate and network through various social media channels to share information and best inland waterways surveying practice. The first practical training event is planned for Thursday 19 April 2018 at Croxley Green, Watford at the P&S Marine Yard on the Continue reading “IIMS forms an Inland Waterways Working Group and announces first training event”

Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold’s bilge system to minimise claims

Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold bilge systems to minimise claims
Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold bilge systems to minimise claims

The UK P&I Club has reminded those working in the marine industry that significant insurance damage claims can result if a bulk cargo is damaged due to the leakage of the bilge system into a loaded bulk cargo hold.

To reduce the chance of such cargo damage, operators and surveyors are advised to inspect and test the cargo hold bilge system as part of the routine pre-loading checks of the cargo holds.

Inspection and testing of cargo hold bilge system non-return valves should be included in routine pre-loading checks of the holds. These non-return valves may not be seated tightly, because of the Continue reading “Operators and surveyors urged to test cargo hold’s bilge system to minimise claims”

Rolls-Royce to provide tug sector with its first Hybrid System

Photo credit: Rolls-Royce
Photo credit: Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce will supply the tug boat sector with its first hybrid propulsion arrangement for installation to a multi-purpose tractor tug undergoing construction for Baydelta Maritime LLC. The vessel is being built at Nichols Brothers Boat Builders, in Washington State, U.S.A.

The order represents the first hybrid tug using proven Rolls-Royce hybrid technology, the first installation of a hybrid system for Nichols Brothers and the first hybrid tug designed by Jensen Maritime, Crowley Maritime Corp’s Seattle-based naval architecture and engineering firm.

The 100-foot long tug will feature the same ship assist and tanker escort capabilities of existing Delta Class harbour tugs but with greatly improved towing performance. The Rolls-Royce hybrid system enhances the Continue reading “Rolls-Royce to provide tug sector with its first Hybrid System”

Revolutionary ultraviolet light-emitting diodes fouling prevention technology under development

Revolutionary ultraviolet light-emitting diodes fouling prevention technology under development
Revolutionary ultraviolet light-emitting diodes fouling prevention technology under development

AkzoNobel has teamed up with Netherlands based healthcare company Royal Philips to develop ultraviolet light-emitting diodes fouling prevention technology.

The system will use technology developed by Royal Philips with the aim of combining experience from both companies to produce an economically viable solution for underwater fouling prevention.

The system will integrate UV light-emitting diodes in a protective coating, which AkzoNobel says will allow for the UV light to be emitted from the coating surface, preventing biofouling from accumulating.

“In our sustainable fouling control initiative, we actively explore and develop alternatives to Continue reading “Revolutionary ultraviolet light-emitting diodes fouling prevention technology under development”

Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design

Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design
Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design

Automation presents a set of unique challenges to designers, insurers and operators of ships. In this article, reprinted from the Shipowners P&I Club website Keir Gravil, a naval architect at Frazer-Nash Consultancy in Bristol, UK discusses some of the key issues that could face automated ships of the future from a design perspective.

It is a truth recognised by many industries that the future of transportation lies with greater automation. Over the last 50 years we have seen huge changes not only in shipping, but in every form of transportation and vehicle. Aircraft now incorporate automation routinely on flights around the world, cars are being developed to drive themselves and many railways have been totally automated for some time. As each step in the evolution of transportation progresses, the human element of control is reduced or eliminated altogether. But what of shipping? Surely an industry the size and scope of international shipping faces unique challenges in the realm of automation?

The background
It is often the job of ship designers, especially those in the naval defence industry, to think ahead and anticipate future technological changes. One could argue that Continue reading “Autonomous vessels – the challenges and opportunities in design”