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The dangers of overplating

Surveyors take note - overplating does not constitute a repair on a steel hull
Surveyors take note – overplating does not constitute a repair on a steel hull

Feature article written by Alan Broomfield MIIMS, who tackles the thorny subject of overplating on steel hulled vessels, in particular Dutch barges and Narrowboats.

It is common practice when in the field surveying steel vessels to find mild steel plates welded to the hull, a practice regularly carried out on leisure vessels as a permanent repair. If any defects are found on the shell of a metal boat during a survey, surveyors are all too quick to recommend that the area concerned be overplated. Marine surveyors who deal with steel vessels will find that very often – Dutch barges and canal boats in particular – are frequently heavily overplated and should remember at all times that such overplating does NOT constitute a repair. It merely hides the defect.

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An introduction to synthetic rigging

Synthetic rigging will replace wire and marine surveyors need to understand this disruptive new technology
Synthetic rigging will replace wire and marine surveyors need to understand this disruptive new technology

Feature article written by Nick Parkyn

Synthetic rigging (also referred to as composite rigging) is disruptive technology that in time will replace stainless steel wire rigging. Since marine surveyors will increasingly come into contact with this type of rigging, they need to understand this new technology to enable them to carry out surveys on craft which use it.

Many new types of synthetic fibres have been discovered in recent years. Typically, they are initially used in aerospace applications and later become available for other application where high performance is required. Most of the high performance fibres are characterised by impressive tensile properties, which with the exception of carbon fibre significantly exceed their compressive strength. With yacht Continue reading “An introduction to synthetic rigging”

The importance of understanding enclosed space working

Enclosed space working and entry in the marine environment is still costing too many lives
Enclosed space working and entry in the marine environment is still costing too many lives

Feature article written by Capt Michael Lloyd RD**, MNM, FNI

Enclosed space working and entry and the resulting deaths caused by poor procedures and/or lack of knowledge each year is a vexing subject and one that the International Institute of Marine Surveying has highlighted before. However, it seems insufficient progress is being made in this area and the number of casualties remains stubbornly high. Capt Michael Lloyd has become passionate about the subject of enclosed space working and is now something of an authority in the field. In this article, Michael shares his current thoughts on the matter and offers some practical tips and advice for surveyors.

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Report only what you know

Feature article written by Capt Barry Thompson HONFIIMS

Although the following account refers to a cargo survey the lessons to be learnt from it by a surveyor apply just as much to a yacht or small craft condition survey — indeed to any ‘fit for purpose’ survey.

In 1985 a New Zealand company ordered just over 22,000 tonnes of compound fertiliser at a C & F cost of US$4.2 million. It was part loaded into the geared bulk-carrier Adelina (26,687 dw, built 1977) in Sweden with the balance in Tampa, Florida. SGS, of worldwide reputation, were the appointed surveyors to certify the holds as clean, dry and fit to receive the fertilizer.

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The secret life of an electric launch by Scruffie Marine

An electric launch by Scruffie Marine takes to the water
An electric launch by Scruffie Marine takes to the water

Feature written by Derek Ellard of Scruffie Marine

Electric boats operate at a fraction of the cost of conventional fossil-fuel powered boats. They offer maximum torque through the whole rev range and ride in silence with no emissions. This means that marinas and waterways will be cleaner and quieter. No noise and no fumes from conventional engines to contend with. Are electric boats the thing of the future? Derek Ellard of Scruffie Marine, based in North Tamborine, Queensland, Australia thinks so and is involved in building them.

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