Bridging the gap between trade and conformity: ICOMIA and the recreational craft directive

ICOMIA has been refining and developing the Recreational Craft Directive for a quarter of a century

ICOMIA has been refining and developing the Recreational Craft Directive for a quarter of a century

ICOMIA brings together national boating federations in one global organisation and represents them at an international level, presenting a strong and united voice when dealing with issues challenging the industry.

No less than 35 national federations across the world are full members of ICOMIA today. Its members include the vast majority of the industrialised countries from North America across to Japan and China and from Finland to New Zealand.

ICOMIA’s working committees predominantly consist of its member associations and provide forums where the national associations can share their experiences and most importantly plan collectively to address issues facing the industry worldwide. ICOMIA’s objectives are to provide a forum for the exchange of views between the different national marine industry associations; to produce internationally agreed standards to ensure high quality and safety of industry’s products; to remove all barriers to trade, wherever they may exist; to promote boats and to give guidelines where appropriate.

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Engine crankshaft deflection measurement

Understanding engine crankshaft deflection measurement will aid a diagnostic engineer

Understanding engine crankshaft deflection measurement will aid a diagnostic engineer

At some time in his career the Diagnostic Engineer may well have to examine the running of a compression ignition engine. Many of the defects that occur on such units are down to wear in the main bearings causing the crankshaft to change its longitudinal straightness. Usually the first diagnostic test on such an engine is to take a series of measurements between the crank webs at various points round the circle of rotation called somewhat in correctly crankshaft deflections. If a driving engine is of the compression ignition type with a cylinder bore above about 250 mm (10 inches), it is also necessary to consider the alignment of its crankshaft. Below that size, the overall stiffness and small size of the unit and the fact that the crankshaft itself is an integral forging make the measurement of crankshaft deflections both extremely difficult and unnecessary.

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Updated third generation silicone fouling release coatings

Feature article prepared by the Research & Development Department, Hempel A/S, February 2016 (Original paper published in 2008)

Traditional fouling release coatings consist of a silicone elastomer (PDMS) and rely on a low surface tension (hydrophobic) and a low modulus of elasticity, usually with a good initial foul free performance. With time, the coatings ability to self-clean is lowered, which results in a higher hull skin friction. The invention behind the 3rd generation fouling release coatings is a unique blend of silicone polymers that has and maintains a more hydrophilic surface, with fouling release performance that lasts. The foul free period is longer, and required speed for self-cleaning is lower. This results in a lower hull skin friction over time with potentially lower fuel consumption.

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An approach to a modern lightning protection system

When lightning strikes, and it does, having a lightning protection system can save your life

When lightning strikes, and it does, having a lightning protection system can save your life

We were lucky when we were struck by lightning on our small 35’ GRP cruising sailing boat in Turkey in 2013, but without an LPS. All the plastic and some of the metal gear at the top of the mast exploded (see photo below) and simultaneously the headlining in the saloon exploded downwards with a loud bang. So much smoke that we initially thought we were on fire; but my wife and I survived unscathed to tell the tale.

The most likely discharge exit was through the propeller shaft, but practically all electronics were violently destroyed and, as an electrical and electronic engineer, my assessment for our insurance claim afterwards showed that most devices had experienced severe arcing with small electronic components having exploded internally (see photo below).

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Machinery, what is the underwriter’s problem?

We are haemorrhaging money! Machinery is the biggest cost in terms of overall claims amount that insurers pay. Machinery incidents amount to over 40% of the overall claims paid by underwriters. To give some background, insurers cover the cost of replacing machinery which has broken as a result of negligence by the crew providing such loss or damage has not resulted from want of due diligence by the
insured, owners or managers. This is very wide coverage and effectively acts as warranty insurance for the machinery. Obviously it is open to abuse and insurers trust the owners to be open and honest when presenting a claim for machinery damage.

I have been in the insurance industry for over 30 years and have benefited from the Braemar’s, previously the Salvage Association, monthly reports. The top four causes of casualty are always machinery, grounding, fire and collision in that order. This is also backed up by the International Union of Marine Insurers (IUMI), where the data is kindly provided by Lloyd’s List Intelligence.

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