The importance of understanding enclosed space working

Enclosed space working and entry in the marine environment is still costing too many lives
Enclosed space working and entry in the marine environment is still costing too many lives

Feature article written by Capt Michael Lloyd RD**, MNM, FNI

Enclosed space working and entry and the resulting deaths caused by poor procedures and/or lack of knowledge each year is a vexing subject and one that the International Institute of Marine Surveying has highlighted before. However, it seems insufficient progress is being made in this area and the number of casualties remains stubbornly high. Capt Michael Lloyd has become passionate about the subject of enclosed space working and is now something of an authority in the field. In this article, Michael shares his current thoughts on the matter and offers some practical tips and advice for surveyors.

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Report only what you know

Feature article written by Capt Barry Thompson HONFIIMS

Although the following account refers to a cargo survey the lessons to be learnt from it by a surveyor apply just as much to a yacht or small craft condition survey — indeed to any ‘fit for purpose’ survey.

In 1985 a New Zealand company ordered just over 22,000 tonnes of compound fertiliser at a C & F cost of US$4.2 million. It was part loaded into the geared bulk-carrier Adelina (26,687 dw, built 1977) in Sweden with the balance in Tampa, Florida. SGS, of worldwide reputation, were the appointed surveyors to certify the holds as clean, dry and fit to receive the fertilizer.

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The secret life of an electric launch by Scruffie Marine

An electric launch by Scruffie Marine takes to the water
An electric launch by Scruffie Marine takes to the water

Feature written by Derek Ellard of Scruffie Marine

Electric boats operate at a fraction of the cost of conventional fossil-fuel powered boats. They offer maximum torque through the whole rev range and ride in silence with no emissions. This means that marinas and waterways will be cleaner and quieter. No noise and no fumes from conventional engines to contend with. Are electric boats the thing of the future? Derek Ellard of Scruffie Marine, based in North Tamborine, Queensland, Australia thinks so and is involved in building them.

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Debunking the myths of the safety management system

A key requirement of the ISM code is an effective safety management system
A key requirement of the ISM code is an effective safety management system

Article written by Nippin Anand PhD MSc Master Mariner FNI

In January 2015, the pure car and truck carrier (PCTC) Hoegh Osaka developed a severe list on departing from Southampton, and was left stranded outside the port for more than 19 days. The official investigation revealed how decision making became the victim of production pressures. The vessel sailed from port without determining accurately the stability conditions upon completion of cargo. It was a routine practice to leave this task to be carried out once the vessel was out at sea; a practice that appears to be common within the PCTC industry. The weights of the cargoes declared at the time of loading were significantly different from the actual weights; a practice that extends even beyond the PCTC industry. The port captain never felt the need to involve the chief officer in the preparation of the stowage plan. The chief officer, on the other hand, did not feel he had the authority to question the pre-stowage plan.

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