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Numerous lessons learned from US maritime casualties in 2017 as NTSB releases its annual report

US Coast Guard photo by Stasia Ellis
US Coast Guard photo by Stasia Ellis

The NTSB has published its 94 page Safer Seas digest annual report giving an overview of key lessons to be learned from a series of major maritime casualties.

NTSB has noted that many of the issues in last year’s report were recurring topics, including fatigue, poor bridge resource management, and distraction. The 41 marine accidents included in the report involved allisions, capsizings, collisions, fires, explosions, flooding, groundings, equipment damage, loss of life, injuries, and significant property damage.

The failure to maintain watertight integrity was the number one cause of Continue reading “Numerous lessons learned from US maritime casualties in 2017 as NTSB releases its annual report”

Inaugural Marine Surveying International Fest 2018 voted a hit

On Tuesday 6th November at 11.00 UK time, IIMS opened the first 24-hour non-stop marathon Marine Surveying International Fest 2018, hosted live from the Institute’s offices in Portchester, Hampshire. The aim of the event was to recognise and celebrate as many different branches of the surveying profession as possible through a series of twenty four presentations with a new subject being introduced on the hour every hour. Presentations were delivered by experts in their field from various worldwide locations including Australia, New Zealand, America, Singapore, South Korea, UAE, India, Europe and the UK.

The presentations have been recorded and are available to purchase. Just one low fee gives you access to the entire video content, which is not being made publicly available at this time.

Here is a review of the content that was delivered: Continue reading “Inaugural Marine Surveying International Fest 2018 voted a hit”

Recommendations on reducing yacht racing risks released

The report team found that the risk clearly depends on the level of congestion.
The report team found that the risk clearly depends on the level of congestion.

A new Volvo Ocean Race (VOR)-commissioned report has examined ocean racing at night in areas of high vessel traffic density to establish possible steps to mitigate risk following the death of a fisherman during the race.

The independent Volvo High Traffic Density Report follows the collision between Vestas 11th Hour Racing and a fishing vessel this January, in the final stages of the leg into Hong Kong during the most recent edition of the race. The crews recounted that virtually all the vessels had some form of lighting and exhibited AIS. The fishing vessels were either stationary or travelling at slow speeds of 3-6 knots and they did not form an impenetrable barrier.

Recommendations made in the report included use of Continue reading “Recommendations on reducing yacht racing risks released”

Cley Harbour rejuvenated after many years of disuse

Photo credit: Chris Taylor
Photo credit: Chris Taylor

Norfolk’s Cley Harbour has received its largest traditional working sailing vessel for more than 60 years, marking its return to activity after falling into disuse.

The Coastal Exploration Company owned 30ft open wooden gaff rigged whelk boat Salford came into the harbour to deliver a cargo of North Norfolk beer from Barsham Brewery to the Cley Windmill.

Simon Read, chairman of Cley Harbour committee said: “This is the largest traditional working sailing vessel to visit Cley in over 60 years and will be mark a key moment in the rejuvenation of Cley Harbour.”

The clinker-built traditional Norfolk fishing boat has remained in and around Norfolk’s waters since it was built in the 1950s and was recently in the filming of Continue reading “Cley Harbour rejuvenated after many years of disuse”

IMO has adopted a plan to address the issue of marine plastic rubbish

Dumping plastics into the sea is already prohibited under MARPOL regulations, which also oblige governments to ensure adequate port reception facilities to receive ship waste.
Dumping plastics into the sea is already prohibited under MARPOL regulations, which also oblige governments to ensure adequate port reception facilities to receive ship waste.

The IMO has pledged to address the significant problem posed by plastics to the marine environment, with the adoption of an action plan which aims to enhance existing regulations and introduce new supporting measures to reduce marine plastic litter from ships.

The plan was adopted on October 26 by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC).

Dumping plastics into the sea is already prohibited under MARPOL regulations, which also oblige governments to ensure adequate port reception facilities to receive ship waste. Under the London Convention and Protocol on the dumping of wastes at sea, only permitted materials can be dumped and this waste – such as from dredging – has to be fully assessed to ensure it does not contain harmful materials like plastics.

However, studies demonstrate that despite the existing regulatory framework to prevent marine plastic litter from ships, discharges into the sea continue to occur. Recognising that more Continue reading “IMO has adopted a plan to address the issue of marine plastic rubbish”

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