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Windfarm crew transfer vessels are getting larger

MHO Gurli and MHO Esbjerg are operated from the third deck, where the wheelhouse and workstations enjoy uninterrupted vision of the turbine tower and surrounding working areas.
MHO Gurli and MHO Esbjerg are operated from the third deck, where the wheelhouse and workstations enjoy uninterrupted vision of the turbine tower and surrounding working areas.

Tasmanian high speed catamaran designers Incat Crowther recently announced the delivery of the 39m Multipurpose Crew Transfer Vessels ‘MHO Gurli’ and ‘MHO Esbjerg’.

The vessels were built by PT Bintang Timur Samudera in Indonesia and delivered to MH-O & Co to be operated in European waters for Orsted in their Hornsea Project One offshore wind farm.

The vessels, designed by Incat Crowther, are the largest Wind Farm Support Vessels to enter service to date anywhere in the world. They draw on Incat Crowther’s experience with larger offshore fast catamarans operating in the oil and gas industry.

The platform was specifically designed to deliver exceptional seakeeping, stability and comfort, whilst accommodating a highly redundant quad-engine / quad-jet propulsion package.

Continue reading “Windfarm crew transfer vessels are getting larger”

Wärtsilä moves towards remote guidance for vessel repair and maintenance

Wärtsilä’s remote guidance service also proved successful during a demonstration in the TT-Lines office
Wärtsilä’s remote guidance service also proved successful during a demonstration in the TT-Lines office

Wärtsilä has successfully tested its remote guidance service, so claiming to have created ‘an entirely new dimension in vessel repair and maintenance operations’.

Through real-time communication using voice-controlled Augmented Reality (AR) wearables and remote guidance software, ship crew members, field service engineers and shipyard personnel can communicate with shore-based experts anywhere in the world.

The tests were carried out onboard the Huckleberry Finn, a RoRo ferry operated by TT-Lines, while sailing between Trelleborg, Sweden and Travemünde, Germany.

Simulated remote guidance service situations were carried out on the ship’s navigation equipment on the bridge and on the shaft line seals and bearings in the engine room.

Continue reading “Wärtsilä moves towards remote guidance for vessel repair and maintenance”

New commercial shipyard facility opened by Fairline at Hythe

Altogether it is hoped 65 boats will be built at both sites in 2019, with the core range from 40 – 60ft built in Arundel and the larger boats built in Hythe.
Altogether it is hoped 65 boats will be built at both sites in 2019, with the core range from 40 – 60ft built in Arundel and the larger boats built in Hythe.

Fairline Yachts has opened a new commercial shipyard facility in Hythe, Southampton.

The shipyard is able to accommodate vessels of up to 950 tonnes and 11.5m beam, which can be removed from the water via the slipway and stored undercover.

The site has more than 10,000sqm of covered working halls with workspace for crew or contractors to carry out required works.

“Opening this new facility is an exciting step for Fairline Yachts,” said Fairline Yachts commercial manager, Robert Hammond.

The shipyard is also capable of berthing vessels from 10m to 100m.

The move follows on from Fairline CEO David Tydemann admitting boatbuilding has been slower than desired at Hythe, largely due to problems recruiting the workforce resulting in a production challenge.

Continue reading “New commercial shipyard facility opened by Fairline at Hythe”

Spirit Yachts set to launch its first electric yacht in early 2020

The yacht’s eco credentials continue below decks with a reversible heating/air conditioning Webasto pump, that will heat and cool the yacht using minimal power.
The yacht’s eco credentials continue below decks with a reversible heating/air conditioning Webasto pump, that will heat and cool the yacht using minimal power.

Spirit Yachts has begun construction of its first electric yacht, a 13.4m vessel due to launch early 2020.

The Spirit 44E, has two solar panels integrated into her deck, colour matched to the teak. These will charge OceanVolt 48VDC 30.4kWh batteries (made up of 48 1.9kWh batteries), which will power an Oceanvolt SD15 electric drive.

“From afar, the Spirit 44E will look like any other Spirit sailing yacht,” said Spirit Yachts head designer Sean McMillan. “Low freeboards, long overhangs, flush decks and the timeless beauty of quality wooden craftsmanship.

Up close, she will display signs of the sailing yachts of the future.”

Hydrogeneration via the propeller is used to regenerate the batteries while sailing, calculated at 1.5kW while sailing at five knots. Continue reading “Spirit Yachts set to launch its first electric yacht in early 2020”

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