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Norwegian Electric Systems selects Corvus Energy storage system for new ferries

The leading manufacturer of energy storage systems for maritime applications, Corvus Energy provides battery power to more ferries than all other providers of energy storage systems combined.
The leading manufacturer of energy storage systems for maritime applications, Corvus Energy provides battery power to more ferries than all other providers of energy storage systems combined.

Corvus Energy has announced that it has been selected by Norwegian Electric Systems (NES) to supply lithium ion battery-based energy storage systems (ESS) for five new all-electric ferries being built by Havyard for Norwegian ferry operator Fjord1.

“Fjord1 continues to forge a very progressive path towards environmentally sustainable operations with these additional all-electric ferries,” says Stein Ruben Larsen, Senior Vice President Sales at NES, a total system integrator of electric systems for the global marine market. With respect to their ESS selection, he remarks, “The proven reliability, safety and performance of the Corvus ESS was important in awarding this contract to Corvus Energy.”

Continue reading “Norwegian Electric Systems selects Corvus Energy storage system for new ferries”

HS2 construction workers find remains of first sailor to circumnavigate Australia

His grave disappeared in the 1840s when the original Euston station was expanded into part of the cemetery.
His grave disappeared in the 1840s when the original Euston station was expanded into part of the cemetery.

Construction workers building the new London-Birmingham high-speed railway line have unearthed the grave of the Royal Navy sailor who gave Australia its name.

For 180 years the last resting place of explorer and navigator Captain Matthew Flinders has been lost among 40,000 other bodies in graves near Euston station. But archaeologists excavating St James’ burial ground to pave the way for the new HS2 terminus have identified the officer’s grave out of the thousands at the site. The lead depositum plate – breast plate – put on top of Flinders’ coffin when he was buried in July 1814 meant his remains could be formally identified.

As commanding officer of HMS Investigator, Flinders sailed from Portsmouth in Continue reading “HS2 construction workers find remains of first sailor to circumnavigate Australia”

Fire caused by moving cargo

One of the containers came loose and hit one of the flat racks with jerry cans.
One of the containers came loose and hit one of the flat racks with jerry cans.

The Swedish Club has released details about a cargo fire caused by moving cargo due to inclement weather conditions. The case has highlighted the importance of detailed planning and discussions among Master, Chief Officer, technical manager or charterer, when it is about critical cargo operations.

The RoRo vessel was underway and expected to sail through heavy weather with up to Beaufort scale 10 winds and eight metre high waves. The cargo onboard consisted mainly of vehicles, containers and jerry cans with fuel on flat racks.

Before loading, the Chief Officer went ashore to inspect the cargo. He inspected the jerry cans that were secured with quick lashings through the handles of each row and secured to bars on the flat racks.

He was concerned that the jerry cans were placed on flat racks and not in containers, as there were no walls around the racks to protect the jerry cans. The flat racks and containers were Continue reading “Fire caused by moving cargo”

UK Department for Transport has launched Maritime 2050

Maritime 2050 is a long term strategic collaboration between the Department of Transport and Maritime UK
Maritime 2050 is a long term strategic collaboration between the Department of Transport and Maritime UK

Maritime 2050 is a collaboration between the Department of Transport and Maritime UK, the body for the UK maritime sector. This is the first ever long-term strategy for the UK maritime sector.

Maritime UK Chair Harry Theochari said: “For the first time the maritime sector has a real long-term strategy – setting out what government and industry will do to position the UK as the world’s leading maritime nation over the coming decades in an increasingly competitive global context. The global ocean economy will double in value to $3trn by 2030. Competitor maritime nations are hungry for the prize, and Maritime 2050 will ensure that the UK is best-placed to capitalise.

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