News

Towing and mooring equipment regulation effective from January 2024

According to Korean Register, amendments to SOLAS II-1/Reg.3-8 “Towing and mooring equipment” were adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee at MSC 102
According to Korean Register, amendments to SOLAS II-1/Reg.3-8 “Towing and mooring equipment” were adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee at MSC 102

According to Korean Register, amendments to SOLAS II-1/Reg.3-8 “Towing and mooring equipment” were adopted by the Maritime Safety Committee at MSC 102 and will enter into force on or after 1 January 2024. In particular, these amendments introduce new safety requirements for design, selection, inspection, maintenances and replacement of mooring and towing arrangements in conjunction with MSC.1/Circ.1175/ Rev.1, MSC.1/Circ.1619 and MSC.1/Circ.1620.

New ship designs, and especially the design of large ships, have resulted in optimized performance and a greater degree of complexity. It is a widely recognized fact that the development and design of mooring systems have not adequately followed the development of ships. Despite efforts to improve how safe mooring operations, there is still a high number of accidents during these operations.

Continue reading “Towing and mooring equipment regulation effective from January 2024”

Battery Energy Storage Systems: Safety guidance published by EMSA

Battery Energy Storage Systems: Safety guidance published by EMSA
Battery Energy Storage Systems: Safety guidance published by EMSA

EMSA battery guidance is the subject of a new publication about the Safety of Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) on-board ships. The guidance aims at supporting maritime administrations and the industry by promoting a uniform implementation of the essential safety requirements for battery systems on-board of ships.

According to the EMSA battery guidance, BESS installations on board ships have been increasing in number. There are more than 800 battery ships in operation across the world, 60% of which are known to be operating in Europe, using batteries onboard for propulsion either in pure electric or hybrid functions. Continue reading “Battery Energy Storage Systems: Safety guidance published by EMSA”

Battery electric vehicles carriage risk guidance published by AMSA

new guidance on the risks associated with the carriage of battery electric vehicles
new guidance on the risks associated with the carriage of battery electric vehicles

The Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) has issued the Guidance on Risks Associated with the Carriage of Battery Electric Vehicles. The safety alert provides guidance to operators of domestic commercial vessels (DCVs) on risks associated with the carriage of battery-powered electric vehicles (BEVs) on roll-on, roll-off (RORO) ferries, and how best to deal with these risks.

As per Marine Order 504 (Certificates of operation and operation requirements) you must conduct a risk assessment for your vessel to ensure that risks arising from the carriage of BEVs are addressed. Consideration must be given to the hazards arising from transporting BEVs Continue reading “Battery electric vehicles carriage risk guidance published by AMSA”

Safer Seas Digest 2022 published by the NTSB

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has published its Safer Seas Digest 2022. In the digest, NTSB highlights the most important lessons learned from 29 maritime tragedies that took place in 2022. Safer Seas Digest 2022 details the lessons learned from these maritime tragedies involving capsizings, contact, collisions, fires, flooding and groundings.

Among the investigations, two of the casualties described, the Emmy Rose and the SEACOR Power, led to the loss of human life. The NTSB investigations into these tragedies once again revealed the critical importance of personal locator beacons (PLBs) for seafarers. Continue reading “Safer Seas Digest 2022 published by the NTSB”

RRS Sir David Attenborough lifeboat davit failure report issued

RRS Sir David Attenborough lifeboat davit failure
RRS Sir David Attenborough lifeboat davit failure

The MAIB has issued an accident investigation report into the lifeboat davit failure aboard RRS Sir David Attenborough. On the 4 March 2021, the port lifeboat from RRS Sir David Attenborough fell into the water while the crew were practising lifeboat drills. The investigation found that a critical interlock device on the lifeboat davits had heavily corroded due to lack of maintenance. The interlock failed to operate correctly and subsequently caused the lifeboat to fall from the davit and into the sea with three crew on board. It also found that the installation of the lifeboat davits was not in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions and did not meet international regulations. Continue reading “RRS Sir David Attenborough lifeboat davit failure report issued”

Boater Report 2023 by published by CRT

Boater Report 2023 by published
Boater Report 2023 by published

The Boater Report 2023 summarises the work undertaken to keep the canal network open and available for navigation and sets out how the Canal & River Trust (CRT) generates the income needed to support boating and the wider use of the waterways.

Covering the period from April 2022 to March 2023, The Boater Report 2023 illustrates how navigation is the core of the CRTs day-to-day spending and objectives. A link to the Report will be included with new boat licences and boat licence renewals.

In a challenging year which illustrated the vulnerability of the ageing canal network and its exposure to extreme and more frequent weather events brought about by climate change, Continue reading “Boater Report 2023 by published by CRT”

Joint Hull Committee issues new clause in wake of lithium battery incidents

Joint Hull Committee issues new clause in wake of lithium battery incidents
Joint Hull Committee issues new clause in wake of lithium battery incidents

Joint Hull Committee to issue a new clause covering the use of electronically driven equipment rated at above 100Wh. In recent years there has been a growing number of marine incidents involving lithium battery fires, resulting in the total losses of yachts, superyachts and other craft.

The Joint Hull Committee, founded in 1910, is the oldest Joint Committee. It comprises underwriting representatives from both the Lloyd’s and International Underwriting Association (IUA) company markets. It represents the interests of those who write marine hull business in the London market and it works through a number of sub-committees, principally Navigating Limits and Risk Assessment. Continue reading “Joint Hull Committee issues new clause in wake of lithium battery incidents”

Spirit of Norfolk: fire onboard passenger vessel investigation report published

Spirit of Norfolk: fire onboard passenger vessel investigation report published
Spirit of Norfolk: fire onboard passenger vessel investigation report published

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has released an investigation report on the engine room fire onboard passenger vessel Spirit of Norfolk in June 2022. The US Coast Guard received a report of an engine room fire aboard the 169-foot-long passenger vessel Spirit of Norfolk while it was underway on the Elizabeth River near Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia. The vessel was on a 2-hour sightseeing cruise with 108 persons on board.

The crew determined they could not enter the smoke-filled engine room to fight the fire, the vessel lost propulsion, and the passengers and crew evacuated to one of the Good Samaritan vessels on scene. The Spirit of Norfolk was towed to a US Navy pier. Continue reading “Spirit of Norfolk: fire onboard passenger vessel investigation report published”

EMSA marine casualties and incidents 2023 annual overview

EMSA marine casualties and incidents 2023
EMSA marine casualties and incidents 2023

The EMSA marine casualties and incidents 2023 annual overview has been published. The report presents statistics on marine casualties and incidents that cover the period from 1st of January 2014 to 31st of December 2022, reported by EU Member States.

According to the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA), 2022 was a positive year considering the reduction or stabilisation of most of the accident indicators, such as the number of occurrences, ships lost, fatalities or injuries. In 2022, there were 2,510 marine casualties and incidents reported, a decrease of 182 from 2021 and 84 from 2020. Continue reading “EMSA marine casualties and incidents 2023 annual overview”

Stern tube damage is on the increase in concerning trend

Claims for stern tube damage have increased considerably over the last few years says recent Gard analysis
Claims for stern tube damage have increased considerably over the last few years says recent Gard analysis

The number of claims for stern tube damage has increased considerably over the last few years and such damages are now one of the more frequent claim types handled by Gard under their hull and machinery policies. A recent Gard analysis has shed light on the issue.

The nature and severity of stern tube damage damage varies greatly – ranging from a simple aft seal leakage that can be rectified over a few days whilst afloat, to loss of propulsion involving costly salvage operations and extended repairs in drydock. Continue reading “Stern tube damage is on the increase in concerning trend”

Bulk cargoes casebook by The Swedish Club

Bulk Cargoes Casebook published by the Swedish Club
Bulk Cargoes Casebook published by the Swedish Club

As part of its commitment to improving safety at sea, The Swedish Club widely shares its claims experiences to help the and shipping community to understand the factors that can lead to common incidents and to learn from the decisions that were made on board at the time and to understand the lessons learned.

In this valuable edition, dedicated to bulk cargoes, The Swedish Club presents 17 cases in brief.

They are:
1.1 Charcoal: Incorrect declaration caused charcoal fire Continue reading “Bulk cargoes casebook by The Swedish Club”

The issues around the transport of microplastic pellets

TT Club have issued advice on the transport of microplastic pellets
TT Club have issued advice on the transport of microplastic pellets

There are a number of concerns surrounding the transport of microplastic pellets, but whilst the debate rages as to how to mitigate the risks to the maritime ecosystem, those arising through the entire freight supply chain need to be recognised, so says TT Club in a recent highlight.

According to Josh Finch, TT Club Logistics Risk Manager, microplastic pellets, often referred to as nurdles, form the building blocks used in the production of most plastic products. They typically measure just a few millimetres in diameter – about the size of a lentil. The release of nurdles into the sea, other waterways or the environment in general have severe ecological implications, since the pellets may be eaten by fish or other sea creatures, as well as by birds. Continue reading “The issues around the transport of microplastic pellets”

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