USCG issues fated duck boat’s Certificate of Inspection in an unusual move

The COI reports operational limitations which may have been exceeded while the voyage took place.
The COI reports operational limitations which may have been exceeded while the voyage took place.

The US Coast Guard released the Certificate of Inspection (COI) for the ‘Stretch Duck 07’, the amphibious tour boat that sunk in Table Rock Lake, Missouri on July 2018 with the loss of 17 lives.

The COI reports operational limitations which may have been exceeded while the voyage took place. The limitation included limits on permissible weather and surface conditions.

It also indicates that the boat’s stability letter was issued on March 2009, and its last “drydock” was carried out in January 2017. Its operations were to occur in Table Rock Lake and nearby Lake Taneycomo, and it was not permitted to operate on the water “when winds exceed thirty-five (35) miles per hour, and/or the wave height exceeds two (2) feet”.

In addition, the US Coast Guard established a Marine Board of Investigation (MBI) after the sinking of the Stretch Duck 07 boat in Branson, Missouri on July 19. An MBI is USCG’s highest level of investigation, and it was last used for the ‘El Faro’ and the disappearance of the fishing vessel ‘Destination.’

USCG also released a guidance to ensure Continue reading “USCG issues fated duck boat’s Certificate of Inspection in an unusual move”

Fire in cargo hold caused by light bulb reveals Maritime NZ report

Maritime NZ describes a fire in the cargo hold of a container ship caused by the heat from a 500 watt light bulb as the ship was berthed in port on New Zealand's East Coast in late 2017.
Maritime NZ describes a fire in the cargo hold of a container ship caused by the heat from a 500 watt light bulb as the ship was berthed in port on New Zealand’s East Coast in late 2017.

Maritime NZ has published its Lookout report. In it they present a range of of maritime casualties, offering some clear lessons that have been learnt. In this incident, Maritime NZ describes a fire in the cargo hold of a container ship caused by the heat from a 500 watt light bulb as the ship was berthed in port on New Zealand’s East Coast in late 2017.

The cargo hold fire incident

The floodlight was unintentionally left on after the hold was filled with timber packs. Some of the timber was destroyed in the fire and other packs charred, but the ship suffered only cosmetic damage. No-one was injured.

The cut timber had been loaded during the day and the 148 metre vessel was due to sail at the change of tide, when the cargo hold fire alarm sounded just before midnight.

Crew donned breathing apparatus to check the site, and reported smoke coming out of Continue reading “Fire in cargo hold caused by light bulb reveals Maritime NZ report”

Broken valve causes oil spill while bunkering

The Swedish P&I Club has described a case of an oil spill during a vessel's bunkering operations which led to an oil spill, the cause of which was a broken valve.
The Swedish P&I Club has described a case of an oil spill during a vessel’s bunkering operations which led to an oil spill, the cause of which was a broken valve.

The Swedish P&I Club has described a case of an oil spill during a vessel’s bunkering operations which led to an oil spill, the cause of which was a broken valve. Following investigation, the Club recommended that all involved parties should be informed when tanks are switched and that the crew must always ensure the valves are completely shut and working.

The incident
The vessel was loading in port and had also planned to bunker fuel using shore trucks. The plan was to load the fuel into port tank 2 and fill it 96%, but the chief engineer changed this just before loading and instead wanted to load port and starboard 3 tanks. The plan was to fill these tanks 90%. The number 3 tanks were half the size of the port and starboard 2 tanks.

The bunker system was lined up to bunker the port 3 tank. Deck scuppers were put in place on deck. The chief engineer then met the truck driver to agree on basic hand signals before connecting the Continue reading “Broken valve causes oil spill while bunkering”

Shipowners P&I Club issues loss prevention and fishing vessel safety publication

There have been many studies carried out over the years showing that fatalities on fishing vessels remain a real threat.
There have been many studies carried out over the years showing that fatalities on fishing vessels remain a real threat.

On the occasion of the launch of Maritime Safety Week by the UK government running this week, the Shipowners Club issued its fishing vessel safety booklet, summarizing key safety tips for one of the most dangerous jobs in the world. There have been many studies carried out over the years showing that fatalities on fishing vessels remain a real threat.

It is essential that the vessel’s skipper and all crew are fully familiarised with the vessel and its equipment, including any vessel-specific quirks, prior to departing a berth. A pre-sailing checklist should be completed, including:

– The operation and maintenance of the fishing equipment.
– The location and operation of safety equipment, ensuring it is free from obstruction
– The onboard layout of the spaces such as void spaces, engine room and cargo spaces.
– The location and operation of key Continue reading “Shipowners P&I Club issues loss prevention and fishing vessel safety publication”

Contracts signed for biggest ever superyacht with green credentials

Deltamarin and Norwegian Yacht Voyages’ new project will operate globally and be capable of accommodating up to 220 people across 110 suites (from 55 square metres) and penthouses (of 160 square metres).
Deltamarin and Norwegian Yacht Voyages’ new project will operate globally and be capable of accommodating up to 220 people across 110 suites (from 55 square metres) and penthouses (of 160 square metres).

Norwegian Yacht Voyages states that she will also be the world’s “first true hybrid expedition mega yacht” and that she’ll boast a LOA of 187.5 metres (615 feet). Azzam, currently the largest superyacht in the world, stretches to 180 metres (590 feet).

Deltamarin will be providing its services with carefully chosen architectural partners, working on the technical aspects and documentation of the development.

Jaakko Lappi, the company’s sales manager, said in a statement, “We are very proud to announce our partnership with Norwegian Yacht Voyages to develop this ambitious project, which is to be the greenest mega yacht we have seen to date. Deltamarin has an excellent track record of designing Continue reading “Contracts signed for biggest ever superyacht with green credentials”

Fatal inland accidents in Russia and Indonesia were avoidable claims ITF

ITF is repeating its call for ILO and other international maritime bodies and authorities to take steps to move towards a modern set of standards for the inland navigation industry.
ITF is repeating its call for ILO and other international maritime bodies and authorities to take steps to move towards a modern set of standards for the inland navigation industry.

Following two deadly and harrowing incidents involving inland navigation vessels in Russia and Indonesia in recent weeks that have claimed the lives of almost 200 people, the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) has expressed its deep concern regarding the industry’s procedural and safety compliance, noting that these accidents could have been prevented.

In the first accident, a catamaran, carrying passengers over its capacity, capsized in the Volga River after colliding with another boat, killing 11 people. Russia’s Investigative Committee said the boat’s captain, who was also the owner of the vessel, was drunk and likely to blame for the crash.

The second incident involved the capsizing of a ferry carrying three times its passenger capacity on Lake Toba, Indonesia, leaving over 190 people dead or missing. The vessel was reportedly operating illegally with Continue reading “Fatal inland accidents in Russia and Indonesia were avoidable claims ITF”

Low speed diesel engines save on claims is the finding of a recent Swedish Club study

Statistically, a vessel will suffer between one and two incidences of main engine damage during its life time, according to the club
Statistically, a vessel will suffer between one and two incidences of main engine damage during its life time, according to the club

In a recent study the Swedish Club has warned that vessels propelled by medium or high speed diesel engines have a claims frequency two and a half times higher than slow speed engines with an average claims cost of about $650,000.

Statistically, a vessel will suffer between one and two incidences of main engine damage during its life time, according to the club. However, the incidence rate varies by vessel class (and engine type).

“Our research shows that bulkers and tankers are the best performers for claims cost,” said senior technical advisor Peter Stalberg. “Most of these vessels have slow speed engines. Conversely passenger vessels/ferries have the highest frequency of main engine claims – 0.066 claims per vessel and year. Often these vessels have multiple medium speed engine installations.”

Stalberg advises that when shipowners have Continue reading “Low speed diesel engines save on claims is the finding of a recent Swedish Club study”

Fire safety on ferries guide issued by the Standard P&I Club

To raise awareness, the Standard P&I Club has published a 36 page guide about fire risks on ferries.
To raise awareness, the Standard P&I Club has published a 36 page guide about fire risks on ferries.

To raise awareness, the Standard P&I Club has published a 36 page guide about fire risks on ferries. This type of ship presents particular risks due to the cargo onboard, including cars, lorries and refrigerated containers. All of these have combustible material and are fire hazards in their own right.

There are numerous causes of fire but the most relevant ones to ferries are:

– Electrical defects, such as overloaded electrical equipment, damaged cables and poorly formed connections. – Electrical faults in vehicles, especially when engines are hot/running. Reefer containers are major sources of fire.
– Mechanical failure, such as ignition from overheated bearings or a catastrophic engine failure.
– Uncontrolled release of oil or flammable liquid coming into contact with a hot surface, or the release of a low flashpoint fuel, such as petrol vapour, coming into contact with a source of ignition.
– Dry, readily combustible materials (such as wood, paper, textiles) coming into contact with an ignition source, – such as a lighted cigarette, sparks or conducted heat from burning or cutting, highintensity lights or defective electrical equipment.

Things to do Continue reading “Fire safety on ferries guide issued by the Standard P&I Club”

Flexible mobdock repair method for underwater shaft seal repairs developed by Hydrex

Diver/technician re-welding the rope guard after shaft seal replacement
Diver/technician re-welding the rope guard after shaft seal replacement

Hydrex has developed a flexible mobdock repair method that enables the underwater replacement of all types and sizes of shaft seals. This technology has been successfully used by Hydrex diver/technicians for over a decade. It allows ship owners to keep their vessel sailing, saving precious time and money.

Damaged stern tube seals will cause an increasing amount of oil leaking or water ingress as the damage worsens. By replacing the seals when the damage is first discovered, Hydrex keeps the down time low. The ship can keep its schedule as seal repairs can be performed during cargo operations. This is done by creating a dry underwater working environment around the shaft.

It is not always straightforward to replace seals, because there can be quite a bit of variation in the configurations of the stern tube itself. There can also be complications with the liners, which can be worn down and show ruts. All this is routinely handled by Hydrex teams on the jobs.

In this article you can find a short summary of some of the recent Continue reading “Flexible mobdock repair method for underwater shaft seal repairs developed by Hydrex”

Chairman of IACS satisfied with association’s achievements, emphasises the importance of being agile

Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen said that over the past year great progress had been made in modernising classification to deal with the digital transformation of shipping
Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen said that over the past year great progress had been made in modernising classification to deal with the digital transformation of shipping

Speaking at the Posidonia trade fair in Athens, Knut Ørbeck-Nilssen, who will hand over the reins of IACS in July, examined how the association had evolved during his time as Chairman.

In an industry undergoing rapid change, the IACS Chairman identified the need for classification societies and IACS itself to be adaptable and prepared for change, while staying true to the core purpose of classification.

Mr Ørbeck-Nilssen said that over the past year great progress had been made in modernising classification to deal with the digital transformation of shipping: “I’m pleased to see the progress that was made in modernising the concept of class, to adapt to the digital transformation we see in shipping today. I say transformation because the progress has truly been astonishing. IACS has embraced the challenges and changes ahead, to support the industry – contributing to the development of a safer and more secure Continue reading “Chairman of IACS satisfied with association’s achievements, emphasises the importance of being agile”

Green light to adopt Methanol given as a sustainable marine fuel

Topic areas of the project’s final reports include the technical feasibility of converting vessels to propulsion using Methanol
Topic areas of the project’s final reports include the technical feasibility of converting vessels to propulsion using Methanol

The Methanol Institute has welcomed the findings of the Sustainable Marine Methanol (SUMMETH) project, which has backed the increased use of Methanol as a marine fuel.

The research concluded that there are no obstacles to the efficient use of Methanol in a converted diesel engine and that smaller vessel conversion projects are feasible and cost-effective, with levels of safety that easily meet existing requirements.

Switching to Methanol would offer immediate environmental benefits, including close to zero SOx and particulate matter emissions and significantly lower NOx emissions compared to conventional marine fuels or biodiesel.

Continue reading “Green light to adopt Methanol given as a sustainable marine fuel”

Netherlands to impose degassing ban on inland navigation vessels

This ban aims to make the air quality around shipping routes better.
This ban aims to make the air quality around shipping routes better.

The Netherlands will impose a nationwide degasification ban for inland navigation vessels. The Minister of Infrastructure and Water Management, Van Nieuwenhuizen, wants the degasification ban to be introduced in the Netherlands by mid-2020.

This ban aims to make the air quality around shipping routes better. Inland shipping vessels often leave harmful emissions in the open air while sailing. The degassing ban must provide about 95% less emissions of harmful volatile substances by 2023.

A taskforce will be created in order to ensure along with the business community that the introduction of this national degassing ban runs Continue reading “Netherlands to impose degassing ban on inland navigation vessels”

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