RMI recommends all immersion suits to be checked rather than spot checks following a number of defective items

RMI recommends all immersion suits to be checked rather than spot checks following a number of defective items
RMI recommends all immersion suits to be checked rather than spot checks following a number of defective items

The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) has published a Marine Safety Advisory notice. In it RMI stresses the importance of properly inspecting and maintaining all immersion suits, following a number of recent cases of defective equipment found onboard RMI flagged vessels.

Since 2019, when RMI shared a marine safety advisory focusing on the importance of following the manufacturer’s instructions for maintaining immersion suits, there have been multiple additional instances of defective or improperly maintained suits on RMI-flagged vessels, one of which resulted in a PSC detention by the US Coast Guard. In that case, “29 of 32 immersion suits were unserviceable due to unsealed seams,” and these suits were only five years old.

On a second occasion during a flag State inspection, an inspector found 38 out of 39 immersion suits not fit for use. In this case, the Continue reading “RMI recommends all immersion suits to be checked rather than spot checks following a number of defective items”

What to know about hatch cover maintenance

What to know about hatch cover maintenance
What to know about hatch cover maintenance

In association with McAusland Turner, The Shipowners Club has published advice on effective hatch cover maintenance for dry cargo ships including preventative action against ingress of water. According to the Club, one of the key requirements in cargo vessel operations is ensuring that the cargo is delivered to the discharge port in the same condition in which it was loaded. Despite improvements in the methods for ensuring that hatch covers are weathertight, claims for wetted cargo that has resulted from water ingress through hatch covers are still being experienced.

In order to ensure that hatch covers are closed sufficiently it is vital that the correct procedures are followed every time the hatches are closed and opened. This can be achieved by ensuring that crew are duly familiar with the manufacturer’s operating instructions, the company’s on board operation procedures, risk assessments and any other relevant policies related to these operations. Occasionally, Continue reading “What to know about hatch cover maintenance”

Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published

Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published
Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published

The Japan Transport Safety Board (JTSB) has published its report into the death of a boatswain while the cargo vessel FIRST AI was mooring off Kyoto in September 2019 when his head was trapped in a hatch cover panel while performing hatch cover closing duty.

A master, Officer A, a chief engineer, a boatswain, and six other crew members boarded the Vessel. While the ship was mooring at Maizuru Port in Kyoto, at around 10:45 on September 9, 2019, Officer A and the boatswain began closing the hatch covers in preparation for departure after finishing the unloading tasks.

While visually checking the condition of the hatch cover on the port upper deck during the closing of the hatch cover, Officer A noticed that the rubber packing 2 for sealing the hatch cover near the Arm that had been temporarily repaired during the previous navigation had flaked. Hence, he instructed the boatswain, who was operating the closure at the hatch cover handling stand on the starboard side of the Continue reading “Fatality of crew member after head trapped in hatch cover panel report published”

MAIB’s Annual Report 2020 published

MAIB's Annual Report 2020 published
MAIB’s Annual Report 2020 published

“I am pleased to introduce MAIB’s annual report 2020. It was another busy and successful year for the Branch improving safety at sea by our sustained output of safety investigation reports, safety digests, and safety bulletins despite lock-down conditions affecting work for much of the year. The Branch raised 1,217 reports of marine accidents and incidents and commenced 19 investigations in 2020,” said Capt Andrew Moll in his opening statement.

In 2020, the MAIB published two investigation reports into the collapse of container stacks on large container ships, both of which were transiting the North Pacific Ocean in heavy weather at the time. Such accidents are challenging to investigate due to the multiple inter-related factors involved and that critical evidence could be lost overboard during the accident. There have been more accidents involving Continue reading “MAIB’s Annual Report 2020 published”

Report published on the a fatality due to improper crane lifting

Report published on the a fatality due to improper crane lifting
Report published on the a fatality due to improper crane lifting

Belgium’s FEBIMA has published an investigation report into the fatality of a crew member onboard the general cargo ship ATLANTIC PROJECT II while in the Port of Antwerp in February 2021. The investigation stressed that the contingency plan on crane lifting operations was not fully implemented.

On February 8th, 2021, stevedores were unloading the MV ATLANTIC PROJECT II while moored at the Port of Antwerp. When tween-deck cargo hold N°3 on PS was empty, the tween-deck pontoons had to be removed by the ship’s crew, using ship’s gear, to allow access to the cargo stowed below.

After the first pontoon was hoisted and moved using the ship’s crane to its stacking position at the aft part of the Continue reading “Report published on the a fatality due to improper crane lifting”

Shipping Risk Survey results published by BDO

Shipping Risk Survey results published by BDO
Shipping Risk Survey results published by BDO

Traditionally, maritime risks have been relatively predictable such as human error, mechanical failures and natural disasters. The continual growth of international trade and the introduction of new technologies mean that shipping industry risks are evolving fast. But is risk management within the sector evolving to meet these challenges? The industry’s recent experiences, for example in managing the grounding of mv Ever Given in the Suez Canal and the COVID-19 pandemic, demonstrate significant embedded resilience within the sector. However this does not mean that there are not opportunities to improve risk management practices in the shipping industry. BDO’s 2020 shipping risk survey results showed that where shipping industry leaders may once have viewed risk Continue reading “Shipping Risk Survey results published by BDO”

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