Cargo collective publishes a Quick Guide to container packing and the CTU Code

Five international freight transport and cargo handling organisations have published a Quick Guide to the United Nations sponsored Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (the CTU Code), together with a checklist of actions and responsibilities for those involved. It is part of a range of activities to further the adoption and implementation of crucial safety practices by the Container Owners Association, the Global Shippers Forum, the International Cargo Handling Co-ordination Association, the TT Club and the World Shipping Council.

With several container fires aboard ships recently, some of them fatal, the organisations believe that adherence to the CTU Code by all Continue reading “Cargo collective publishes a Quick Guide to container packing and the CTU Code”

Netherlands set to ban degassing of ships in transit

Netherlands set to ban degassing of ships in transit
Netherlands set to ban degassing of ships in transit

As there is more focus on the environmental impact and all forms of emissions in the shipping sector, the practice known as degassing is coming under scrutiny. In particular, the Netherlands looks set to ban degassing of ships in transit.

The concerns focus on the potential for the release of harmful gasses with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the process known in the industry as degassing. Environmentalists contend that the process creates health risks for crew, workers in the port, and surrounding communities. They believe it is hazardous to the environment and creates safety risks in the port.

After unloading a liquid cargo, and before they can take on new shipments, ships need to vent their Continue reading “Netherlands set to ban degassing of ships in transit”

UK to accept CE-certified products with Recreational Craft Directive until end of 2021

UK to accept CE-certified products with Recreational Craft Directive until end of 2021
UK to accept CE-certified products with Recreational Craft Directive until end of 2021

IMCI, the Brussels-based International Marine Certification Institute, has issued a statement to say that all products that are certified under the Recreational Craft Directive (RCD) by IMCI will be able to be placed on the UK market with the CE mark until 1 January 2022.

According to new guidance released by the UK government, industry will be able to use the CE marking until 31 December 2021 if any of the following apply:

– CE marking is applied to goods on the basis of self-declaration
– a mandatory third-party conformity assessment was carried out by an EU-recognised Notified Body Continue reading “UK to accept CE-certified products with Recreational Craft Directive until end of 2021”

What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?

What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?
What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?

Shipping is the backbone of the global economy, responsible for about 90% of world trade. But it also accounts for almost 3% (and rising) of man-made carbon dioxide emissions. The industry’s regulator set a series of emission-cutting targets back in 2018 aimed at driving a transition away from high-polluting fossil fuels. If the more ambitious goals are to be hit, the world’s ships will need to start burning new, clean fuel by 2030; such as biofuels. The question is, which one?

1. What are the bio-bunker options for ships after 2030?
Ships burn about 5 million barrels of fossil fuel every day, pumping a constant stream of CO2 and other chemical nasties into the atmosphere. Yet figuring out the fuel of the future isn’t just about emissions. It’s got to have enough power to propel gigantic tankers around the globe, be storable and transportable, and, of course, not too costly. Here’s a list of the front- Continue reading “What types of biofuels could ships burn in 2030?”

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