NDT increasingly used to detect cracks in large masts in a changing insurance environment

A collaboration with rope supplier Marlow shares data about safe working loads of sheet and halyard systems, using Marine Results’ specialist destructive testing facility to evaluate the breaking loads.
A collaboration with rope supplier Marlow shares data about safe working loads of sheet and halyard systems, using Marine Results’ specialist destructive testing facility to evaluate the breaking loads.

Already well known in the market for rig management and survey projects on the world’s largest and most advanced sailing yachts, Marine Results is now using non-destructive testing to detect cracks and flaws in masts.

This testing uses non-invasive ultra-sonic screening with the company supporting the Grand Prix circuit, Americas Cup, GC32, TP52s and Open 60s.

“We frequently work as part of a larger team with other suppliers on major rig projects,” explained director Jon Morris.

“The data that we produce from the megayachts in collaboration with our regular partners trickles right down to the mass market enabling design standards to advance across the industry.”

A collaboration with rope supplier Marlow shares data about safe working loads of sheet and halyard systems, using Marine Results’ specialist destructive testing facility to evaluate the breaking loads.

“The data produced from megayachts in collaboration with our regular partners trickles down to the mass market enabling design standards to advance across the industry,” says Jon.

Marine Results has also noticed changes in the stipulations of rig insurers.

“Mast and rigging packages are increasingly sophisticated in terms of exotic carbon materials,” says Jon. “Costs of replacing due to rig failure and racing incidents have significantly risen.

“Insurers are tightening up their policies and often specifying regular inspections to meet the recommendations of the spar and equipment manufacturers.”

In addition, Jon says there are increased discussions by the main large yacht classification bodies in relation to in-service inspections and working at height.

“Risk awareness has increased following a number of recent deaths of people working aloft, an issue we have been trying to highlight for some years now.”

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