Lubrication oil failure the most common cause of main engine damage

Lubrication oil failure the most common cause of main engine damage
Lubrication oil failure the most common cause of main engine damage

According to the Swedish Club reveals, lubrication oil failure is the most common cause of main engine damage and a major contributing factor to auxiliary engine breakdowns. The Club has released a new 12 page Engine Damage publication, featuring three case studies, which can be downloaded below.

Main engine damage is an expensive category of claims that occurs far too frequently. Statistically, a vessel will suffer between one and two incidences of main engine damage during its lifetime. The Swedish Club publication contains quick facts and case studies from real-life situations showcasing some of the most common causes of engine damage.

Quick facts
– Lubrication oil-related failure is the most common cause of main engine damage and a major contributing factor to auxiliary engine breakdowns.
– Vessels propelled by medium/high-speed engines have a claims frequency 2.5 times higher than slow-speed engines.
– In comparison with other vessels insured by the Club, bulkers and tankers are the best performers with regard to main engine claims cost. The majority of these vessels have slow-speed engines.
– Passenger vessels/ferries have the highest frequency of main engine claims – often these vessels have multiple medium speed engine installations.
– Approximately 50% of all auxiliary engine damage occurs immediately after maintenance work.
– Incorrect maintenance and wrongful repair are the most common causes of damage to auxiliary engines. In most cases, this is due to the incorrect assembly of vital engine parts in connection with regular overhaul, in particular, the assembly of connecting rods, bearings, and pistons.
– The most expensive type of main engine damage is on crank shaft and associated bearings with an average cost of MUSD 1.2 per claim, as spare parts are expensive and the repairs labour intensive.

Time and time again we see problems that would have been prevented by having a well-implemented and proper management system, the Club notes. This can be easily achieved through proper training and education of the crew, providing them with the essential knowledge and experience required for ordinary daily work and maintenance according to company procedures, the publication highlights.

It is highly recommended that members have a computer-based planned maintenance system (PMS) onboard linked with the shore organization. The PMS should be approved and audited by a classification society to ensure a good standard.

Download the publication: Engine Damage Loss Prevention Supplement

Read another article related to lubrication oil: Lubrication oil filter was mounted poorly resulting in engine failure

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